inelastic Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “inelastic” in the English Dictionary

"inelastic" in British English

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inelasticadjective

uk   /ˌɪn.ɪˈlæs.tɪk/  us   /-t̬ɪk/
not ​changing much, or not ​allowing much ​change: For ​skilledoccupations the ​supply of ​labour is ​typicallyfairly inelastic, because few ​workers are ​capable of doing the ​work. The ​demand for ​services such as ​water, ​gas, and ​electricity is ​relatively inelastic.
(Definition of inelastic from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"inelastic" in Business English

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inelasticadjective

uk   us   /ˌɪnɪˈlæstɪk/
ECONOMICS relating to a ​situation in which the ​amount of a ​productsold or ​suppliedchanges very little in relation to the product's ​price: Cereal ​prices are considered "inelastic," ​meaning that a 10-percent ​priceincrease tends to ​boostsupplies by only one or two ​percentagepoints. Supply of ​oil is notoriously inelastic: it can only ​respond slowly to ​pricechanges.
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(Definition of inelastic from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “inelastic”
in Chinese (Simplified) 无变化的…
in Chinese (Traditional) 無變化的,不容許變化的,沒有彈性的…
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