inertia Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “inertia” in the English Dictionary

"inertia" in British English

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inertianoun [U]

uk   /ɪˈnɜː.ʃə/  us   /-ˈnɝː-/

inertia noun [U] (LACK OF ACTIVITY)

lack of ​activity or ​interest, or ​unwillingness to make an ​effort to do anything: The ​organization is ​stifled by ​bureaucratic inertia.

inertia noun [U] (FORCE)

specialized physics the ​physicalforce that ​keeps something in the same ​position or ​moving in the same ​direction
(Definition of inertia from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"inertia" in American English

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inertianoun [U]

 us   /ɪˈnɜr·ʃə/
the ​tendency not to ​change what is ​happening: Many ​teachers were ​reluctant to use ​computers in ​theirclassroomssimply out of inertia. physics Inertia is the ​force that ​causes something ​moving to ​tend to ​continuemoving, and that ​causes something not ​moving to ​tend to ​continue not to move.
(Definition of inertia from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"inertia" in Business English

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inertianoun [U]

uk   us   /ɪˈnɜːʃə/
a ​situation in which there is very little ​activity or ​interest, or ​people are unwilling to make an ​effort to ​change: bureaucratic/​government/​managerial inertia
(Definition of inertia from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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