Meaning of “insensitive” in the English Dictionary

"insensitive" in British English

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insensitiveadjective

uk /ɪnˈsen.sɪ.tɪv/ us /ɪnˈsen.sə.t̬ɪv/

C1 disapproving not feeling or showing sympathy for other people's feelings, or refusing to give importance to something:

It was a bit insensitive of Fiona to talk about fat people when she knows Mandy is desperate to lose weight.
The police have been criticized for being insensitive to complaints from the public.

not showing any reaction to something, or unable to feel something:

The protective covering must be insensitive to light and heat.
His feet seem to be insensitive to pain.
insensitively
adverb uk /ɪnˈsen.sɪ.tɪv.li/ us /ɪnˈsen.sə.t̬ɪv.li/
insensitivity
noun [ U ] uk /ɪnˌsen.sɪˈtɪv.ə.ti/ us /ɪnˌsen.səˈtɪv.ə.t̬i/

His insensitivity towards the feelings of others is remarkable.
an insensitivity to pain/light/noise

(Definition of “insensitive” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"insensitive" in American English

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insensitiveadjective

us /ɪnˈsen·sə·t̬ɪv/

not aware of other people’s feelings, or not showing sympathy for the feelings of other people:

The governor apologized for his insensitive remarks about the homeless.

Insensitive can also mean not noticing the effects of something or unable to feel something:

His feet seem to be insensitive to pain.
insensitivity
noun [ U ] us /ɪnˌsen·səˈtɪv··t̬i/

I find your insensitivity to my needs insulting.

(Definition of “insensitive” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)