instinct Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “instinct” in the English Dictionary

"instinct" in British English

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instinctnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈɪn.stɪŋkt/
C2 the way ​people or ​animalsnaturallyreact or ​behave, without having to ​think or ​learn about it: All his instincts told him to ​stay near the ​car and ​wait for ​help. [+ to infinitive] Her first instinct was torun. It is instinct that ​tells the ​birds when to ​begintheirmigration.figurative Bobseems to have an instinct for (= is ​naturally good at)knowing which ​products will ​sell.
(Definition of instinct from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"instinct" in American English

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instinctnoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈɪn·stɪŋkt/
a ​naturalability that ​helps you ​decide what to do or how to ​act without ​thinking: [U] He ​lacked the instinct for ​quickaction. [C] His ​biggestasset may be his ​political instincts. Instinct is also the ​ability to ​behave in a ​particular way that has not been ​learned: [U] the ​maternal instinct
(Definition of instinct from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “instinct”
in Korean 본능…
in Arabic غَريزة…
in Malaysian naluri…
in French instinct…
in Russian инстинкт…
in Chinese (Traditional) 本能,直覺…
in Italian istinto…
in Turkish içgüdü, doğal eğilim…
in Polish instynkt…
in Spanish instinto…
in Vietnamese khuynh hướng bẩn sinh…
in Portuguese instinto…
in Thai สัญชาตญาณ…
in German der Instinkt…
in Catalan instint…
in Japanese 本能…
in Chinese (Simplified) 本能,直觉…
in Indonesian naluri, insting…
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