Meaning of “intensive” in the English Dictionary

"intensive" in British English

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intensiveadjective

uk /ɪnˈten.sɪv/ us /ɪnˈten.sɪv/

B2 involving a lot of effort or activity in a short period of time:

two weeks of intensive training
an intensive course in English
Intensive bombing had reduced the city to rubble.

More examples

  • The course compresses two year's training into six intensive months.
  • The soil has been so heavily leached through intensive farming that it is no longer fertile.
  • The allies let loose an intensive artillery bombardment over the border.
  • As agriculture became more capital intensive, many farm labourers moved to the towns and cities to look for work.
  • In some areas, modern intensive farming is giving way to the re-introduction of traditional methods.
intensively
adverb uk /ɪnˈten.sɪv.li/ us /ɪnˈten.sɪv.li/

(Definition of “intensive” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"intensive" in American English

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intensiveadjective

us /ɪnˈten·sɪv/

needing or using great energy or effort:

We’re in the midst of intensive negotiations.
an intensive workout

Intensive study or training deals with a lot of information in a short period of time:

a month-long intensive course in Spanish
intensively
adverb /ɪnˈten·sɪv·li/

(Definition of “intensive” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"intensive" in Business English

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intensiveadjective

uk /ɪnˈtensɪv/ us

involving a lot of effort or activity in a short period of time:

June and July are a period of intensive activity for our company.
intensive talks/discussions/negotiations
intensive training/teaching/courses

using a lot of something:

We are a technology-intensive company.
resource-intensive industries

(Definition of “intensive” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)