interface Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “interface” in the English Dictionary

"interface" in British English

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interfacenoun [C]

uk   /ˈɪn.tə.feɪs/  us   /-t̬ɚ-/
a ​connection between two ​pieces of ​electronicequipment, or between a ​person and a ​computer: My ​computer has a ​network interface, which ​allows me to get to other ​computers. The new ​version of the ​program comes with a much ​better user interface (= way of ​showinginformation to a ​user) than the ​original. a ​situation, way, or ​place where two things come together and ​affect each other: the interface betweentechnology and ​tradition We need a ​clearer interface betweenmanagement and the ​workforce.

interfaceverb

uk   /ˈɪn.tə.feɪs/  us   /-t̬ɚ-/
[T] specialized computing to ​connect two or more ​pieces of ​equipment, such as ​computers: The ​computers must be ​properly interfaced. [I] to ​communicate with someone, ​especially in a ​work-relatedsituation: We use ​email to interface withourcustomers.
(Definition of interface from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"interface" in American English

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interfacenoun [C]

 us   /ˈɪn·tərˌfeɪs/
the ​place where two ​systems come together and have an ​effect on each other, or a ​connection between two ​computers or between a ​person and a ​computer: Amphibians ​live at the interface of ​land and ​sea. To ​simplifysoftware, you ​improveits interface.

interfaceverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈɪnt·ərˌfeɪs/
to ​communicate or ​cause someone or something to ​communicate: [I] Neighborhood ​groups here interface very well with ​police.
(Definition of interface from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"interface" in Business English

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interfacenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈɪntəfeɪs/
IT the way in which ​information is made ​available to the ​user on the ​screen of a ​computer, ​mobilephone, etc.: A ​user-friendlyshopping interface is ​essential if you want to encourage ​customers to ​buyonline. a user/​computer/​software interface
the ​point at which two different ​systems, ​activities, etc. have an ​influence on each other: interface between sth and sth the interface between ​business and Governmentinterface with sth The decision is ​based on the need to ​create a more ​efficient interface with our ​customers.
IT a ​connection between two ​pieces of ​electronicequipment: a network interface card/​controller

interfaceverb

uk   us   /ˈɪntəˌfeɪs/
[I] if two ​people, ​companies, ​systems, etc. interface, they are in ​contact and ​work together with each other: interface with sb/sth All ​workers at the ​airport should be ​willing to interface with ​local law-enforcement ​personnel as and when necessary.
[I or T] IT if a ​computer, ​mobilephone, etc. interfaces with another ​system or ​piece of ​equipment, or is interfaced with it, it can be ​connected to or used with it: interface (sth) with sth Wireless Application Protocols are ​standards that ​govern how ​mobilephones interface with the World Wide Web.
(Definition of interface from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“interface” in Business English

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