interruption Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “interruption” in the English Dictionary

"interruption" in British English

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interruptionnoun [C or U]

uk   /ˌɪn.təˈrʌp.ʃən/  us   /-t̬ə-/
B2 an ​occasion when someone or something ​stops something from ​happening for a ​shortperiod: a ​brief interruption I ​worked all ​morning without interruption.
(Definition of interruption from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"interruption" in Business English

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interruptionnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˌɪntəˈrʌpʃən/
an occasion when someone or something ​stops something from ​happening for a ​shortperiod: constant/frequent interruptions He ​found he ​worked better at ​home without the constant interruptions of his ​staff.
an occasion when a ​company is prevented from ​operating as ​normal: We will endeavour to ​minimizesupplychain interruptions. Business will continue as usual, without interruption.interruption in sth Energy ​traders are ​protected should an unexpected interruption in ​supply prevent them ​honouring their ​contractsinterruption of sth The ​strike could ​result in widespread interruption of US ​railservices.
(Definition of interruption from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “interruption”
in Arabic مُقاطَعة…
in Korean 방해…
in Portuguese interrupção…
in Catalan interrupció…
in Japanese 中断, 妨害…
in Chinese (Simplified) 打断, 短暂中止…
in Turkish kesilme, ara verme, kesen…
in Russian перерыв, помеха…
in Chinese (Traditional) 打斷, 短暫中止…
in Italian interruzione…
in Polish przerwa, zakłócenie, przerywanie…
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“interruption” in Business English

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