introduction Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “introduction” in the English Dictionary

"introduction" in British English

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introductionnoun

uk   us   /ˌɪn.trəˈdʌk.ʃən/

introduction noun (PUT INTO USE)

B2 [U] an ​occasion when something is put into use or ​brought to a ​place for the first ​time: The introduction of new ​workingpractices has ​dramaticallyimprovedproductivity. Within a ​year of ​its introduction, ​questionsbegan to ​emerge about the ​safety of the ​drug.specialized The introduction of the ​tube into the ​artery is a very ​delicateprocedure.
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introduction noun (GIVING SB'S NAME)

B2 [C or U] the ​action of ​telling someone another person's ​name the first ​time that they ​meet: You'll have to do/make the introductions - I don't ​know everyone's ​name. My next ​guest needs no introduction (= is already ​known to everyone).

introduction noun (BEGINNING)

B2 [C] the first ​part of something: Have you ​read the introduction to the third ​edition? The song's ​great, but the introduction's a ​bit too ​long.

introduction noun (FIRST EXPERIENCE)

C1 [S] the first ​time someone ​experiences something: That ​trip was my introduction to ​wintersports.

introduction noun (BASIC KNOWLEDGE)

B2 [C] a ​book or ​course that ​providesbasicknowledge about a ​subject: an introduction topsychology
(Definition of introduction from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"introduction" in American English

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introductionnoun

 us   /ˌɪn·trəˈdʌk·ʃən/

introduction noun (SPEECH)

literature [C] a ​shortspeech or ​piece of writing that comes before a ​longerspeech or written ​text, usually giving ​basicinformation about what is to ​follow: The author’s introduction ​explains the ​organization of the ​book.

introduction noun (FORMAL MEETING)

[C] the ​act of ​formallypresenting someone to a ​group: Let me do the introductions (= ​introduce everyone to each other).

introduction noun (FIRST USE)

[U] the ​act of putting something into use for the first ​time, or of putting something into a new ​place: The introduction of ​expressbuses is ​scheduled for ​July.
(Definition of introduction from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"introduction" in Business English

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introductionnoun

uk   us   /ˌɪntrəˈdʌkʃən/
[U] COMMERCE, MARKETING the ​act of making ​goods or ​servicesavailable to be ​bought for the first ​time: the introduction of sth to sth The ​company has announced the introduction of a new games console to the ​market.
[C] COMMERCE, MARKETING a ​product or ​service that is made ​available for the first ​time: She has successfully ​enhanced the ​financialstability of the ​company through product introductions.
[U] the ​bringing in of something such as a new ​system, ​rule, or ​method: the introduction of sth Problems at the ​company have been caused by the introduction of a new ​computersystem. These ​procedures now only take a few ​seconds to complete thanks to the introduction of £30m of new ​technology. She ​campaigned for the introduction of a ​nationalminimumwage.
[C or U] the ​act of ​introducing one ​person to another: Our next ​guest speaker ​needs little introduction. Shall I do the introductions?
[C] the first ​part of something such as a ​book or ​report: introduction to sth In the introduction to the ​book I used ​data from the Performance Measurement Association.
LAW a ​situation in which a new ​law is ​formally suggested to be discussed and ​voted on by a ​parliament: The first ​step in Parliamentary ​procedure is the introduction and first reading of the ​bill.
(Definition of introduction from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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