Meaning of “invade” in the English Dictionary

british dictionary

"invade" in British English

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invadeverb

uk /ɪnˈveɪd/ us /ɪnˈveɪd/

B2 [ I or T ] to enter a country by force with large numbers of soldiers in order to take possession of it:

Concentrations of troops near the border look set to invade within the next few days.

C1 [ I or T ] to enter a place in large numbers, usually when unwanted and in order to take possession or do damage:

Hundreds of squatters have invaded waste land in the hope that they will be allowed to stay.

[ T ] to enter an area of activity in a forceful and noticeable way:

Maria looks set to invade the music scene with her style and image.

C2 [ T ] to spoil a situation or quality for another person without thinking about their feelings:

Famous people often find their privacy is invaded by the press.

More examples

  • The Spanish Armada was sent by the king of Spain to invade England in 1588.
  • Supporters invaded the pitch.
  • The D-Day landings began on 6 June 1944, when Allied forces invaded Normandy.
  • They fought fearlessly against the troops who were invading from the north.
  • The country does not have the resources to invade its neighbour.

(Definition of “invade” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"invade" in American English

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invadeverb [ I/T ]

us /ɪnˈveɪd/

to enter a place by force, often in large numbers:

[ T ] The Allies were poised to invade Germany.
[ T ] fig. I think that the opportunity is definitely there for people to invade your privacy when they want to (= find out personal things about you against your wishes).

(Definition of “invade” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)