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Meaning of “invoke” in the English Dictionary

"invoke" in British English

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invokeverb [T]

uk   /ɪnˈvəʊk/  us   /ɪnˈvoʊk/ formal
to use a law in order to achieve something, or to mention something in order to explain something or to support your opinion or action: Police can invoke the law to regulate access to these places.
to request help from someone, especially a god, when you want to improve a situation: Their sacred dance is performed to invoke ancient gods.
to make someone have a particular feeling or remember something
invocation
noun [C or U] uk   /ˌɪn.vəˈkeɪ.ʃən/  us   /ˌɪn.vəˈkeɪ.ʃən/
(Definition of invoke from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"invoke" in American English

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invokeverb [T]

 us   /ɪnˈvoʊk/
  • invoke verb [T] (CALL FOR HELP)

to call on something or someone, esp. God, for help
  • invoke verb [T] (USE)

to cause something to be used; bring into effect: Rather than answer the question, the witness invoked the Fifth Amendment against incriminating himself.
(Definition of invoke from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"invoke" in Business English

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invokeverb [T]

uk   us   /ɪnˈvəʊk/ formal
to use something such as a law to help you when you want to do something: Regulators said they would invoke legal powers to enforce the change.
IT to make a computer program start working: invoke sth from sth You may have to invoke the program from the command line.
(Definition of invoke from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“invoke” in British English

“invoke” in American English

“invoke” in Business English

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