Meaning of “ironic” in the English Dictionary

"ironic" in British English

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ironicadjective

uk /aɪˈrɒn.ɪk/ us /aɪˈrɑː.nɪk/ also ironical, uk /aɪˈrɒn.ɪ.kəl/ us /-ˈrɑː.nɪ.kəl/

C2 interesting, strange, or funny because of being very different from what you would usually expect:

[ + that ] It is ironic that although many items are now cheaper to make, fewer people can afford to buy them.

showing that you really mean the opposite of what you are saying:

an ironic comment/reply
ironically
adverb uk /aɪˈrɒn.ɪ.kəl.i/ us /aɪˈrɑː.nɪ.kəl.i/

(Definition of “ironic” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"ironic" in American English

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ironicadjective

us /ɑɪˈrɑn·ɪk/ also ironical, /ɑɪˈrɑn·ɪ·kəl/

ironic adjective (USING OPPOSITE WORDS)

using words that suggest the opposite of what you intend, usually in order to be humorous:

The play was full of witty, ironic banter.
[ + that clause ] It’s really ironic that I would be asked to write about pets today because just yesterday our dog ran away.

ironic adjective (HAVING OPPOSITE EFFECT)

odd or humorous because something has a different or opposite result from what is expected:

[ + that clause ] It’s really ironic that I would be asked to write about pets today because just yesterday our dog ran away.

(Definition of “ironic” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)