irony Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “irony” in the English Dictionary

"irony" in British English

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ironynoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈaɪ.rə.ni/

irony noun [U] (OPPOSITE RESULT)

C2 a ​situation in which something which was ​intended to have a ​particularresult has the ​opposite or a very different ​result: The irony (of it) is that the new ​taxsystem will ​burden those it was ​intended to ​help.
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irony noun [U] (TYPE OF SPEECH)

C2 the use of words that are the ​opposite of what you ​mean, as a way of being ​funny: Her ​voice heavy with irony, Simone said, "We're so ​pleased you were ​able to ​stay so ​long." (= Her ​voice made it ​obvious they were not ​pleased.)
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(Definition of irony from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"irony" in American English

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ironynoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈɑɪ·rə·ni, ˈɑɪ·ər·ni/
a ​type of usually ​humorousexpression in which you say the ​opposite of what you ​intend: [U] He had a ​powerfulsense of irony, and you could never be ​absolutelysure when he was ​serious. Irony is also something that has a different or ​oppositeresult from what is ​expected: [C] It is one of the ironies of ​life that by the ​time you have ​earned enough ​money for the things you always ​wanted, you no ​longer have the ​energy to ​enjoy them. literature Irony is a ​style of writing in which there is a ​noticeable, often ​humorous, ​difference between what is said and the ​intendedmeaning.
(Definition of irony from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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