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Meaning of “join” in the English Dictionary

"join" in British English

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joinverb

uk   /dʒɔɪn/  us   /dʒɔɪn/
  • join verb (CONNECT)

B1 [T] to connect or fasten things together: A long suspension bridge joins the two islands. Join the two pieces together using strong glue. The island is joined to the mainland by a road bridge. If you join (up) the dots on the paper, you'll get a picture.
B1 [I or T] If roads or rivers join, they meet at a particular point: The A11 joins the M11 south of Cambridge. The River Murray and the River Darling join east of Adelaide.

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  • join verb (DO TOGETHER)

A2 [I or T] to get involved in an activity or journey with another person or group: I don't have time for a drink now, but I'll join you later. Why don't you ask your sister if she would like to join us for supper? We took the ferry across the Channel and then joined (= got on) the Paris train at Calais. If you're buying tickets, please join the queue (= stand at the end of it). I'm sure everyone will join me in wishing you a very happy retirement (= everyone else will do this too). The police have joined with (= they have begun to work with) the Drug Enforcement Agency in trying to catch major drug traffickers. The design company is planning to join up with a shoe manufacturer and create a new line of footwear.

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  • join verb (BECOME A MEMBER)

A2 [I or T] to become a member of an organization: I felt so unfit after Christmas that I decided to join a gym. It's a great club. Why don't you join?
join the ranks
to become one of a particular large group of people: When I leave school at the end of this month, I'll probably have to join the ranks of the unemployed.

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Phrasal verbs

joinnoun [C]

uk   /dʒɔɪn/  us   /dʒɔɪn/
(Definition of join from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"join" in American English

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joinverb [I/T]

 us   /dʒɔɪn/
  • join verb [I/T] (DO WITH)

to do something with or be with someone or something: [T] Why don’t you ask your sister if she would like to join us for dinner? [T] I’m sure everyone will join me in wishing you a very happy birthday. [I] Won’t you join with us in planning the party?
  • join verb [I/T] (BECOME A MEMBER)

to become a member of an organization: [T] I’ve decided to join a gym. [I] It’s a great club – why don’t you join?
  • join verb [I/T] (FASTEN)

to cause something to be attached or fastened to another thing, or to bring two or more things together in this way; connect: [T] A long suspension bridge joins the island with the mainland.
If roads or rivers join, they meet at a particular point: [I] The Missouri River and Mississippi River join north of St. Louis.
join hands
If two or more people join hands, they hold each other’s hands, esp. before doing some activity: This folk dance begins with everyone joining hands to form a circle.
(Definition of join from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"join" in Business English

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joinverb

uk   us   /dʒɔɪn/
[T] to connect or fasten two or more things together: join sth to sth Small screws are used to join the front panel to the sides.join sth together The pieces are joined together with glue.
[I or T] to become a member of a club, etc., or to start working for a company or an organization: Have you joined the pension plan? I joined the company immediately after college.
[I or T] to get involved in an activity with another person or group: join sb for sth Will you join us for dinner?join sb in doing sth I'm sure everyone will join me in wishing James a very happy retirement.
[I or T] TRANSPORT to get on a bus, train, or plane: Passengers who joined at Manchester should have their tickets ready for inspection.
join the dots
to connect two things or ideas in order to produce something new, or to show the relationship between different things: We need to join the dots between our current products and the needs of this new market.
join forces
to act with somebody else in order to do something: The two companies have joined forces to make the Web applications available to a wider public.

joinnoun [C]

uk   us   /dʒɔɪn/
a place where two things meet or are connected together: Oil is leaking out at the join between the two pipes.
(Definition of join from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“join” in Business English

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