Meaning of “jolt” in the English Dictionary

"jolt" in British English

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joltverb

uk /dʒəʊlt/ us /dʒoʊlt/

joltnoun [ C ]

uk /dʒəʊlt/ us /dʒoʊlt/

(Definition of “jolt” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"jolt" in American English

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joltverb [ T ]

us /dʒoʊlt/

to cause something or someone to move suddenly and violently, or to surprise someone in an unpleasant way:

I was jolted out of bed by the earthquake.
He was jolted by the sight of bodies lying in the lobby.

joltnoun [ C ]

us /dʒoʊlt/

a sudden, violent movement or force, or a large and unpleasant surprise:

jolts of electricity
She bumped into him, and the jolt sent his books to the ground.
Jack realized with a jolt of fear that he was helpless.

(Definition of “jolt” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"jolt" in Business English

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joltnoun [ C ]

uk /dʒəʊlt/ us

an unexpected event that makes prices, levels of activity, etc. change suddenly:

a jolt to sth Following the jolt to markets caused by fears about higher inflation, traders remain cautious.
get/receive/suffer a jolt

joltverb [ T ]

uk /dʒəʊlt/ us

to make prices, levels of activity, etc. change suddenly:

Rising oil prices and the continued slump in the housing market combined to jolt consumer confidence.
be jolted by sth Global markets have been jolted by the half point rise in US interest rates.

(Definition of “jolt” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)