juggle Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “juggle” in the English Dictionary

"juggle" in British English

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juggleverb

uk   /ˈdʒʌɡ.əl/  us   /ˈdʒʌɡ.əl/
(Definition of juggle from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"juggle" in American English

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juggleverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈdʒʌɡ·əl/
to throw several objects into the air, catch them, and keep them moving so that at least one is always in the air: [T] fig. Many women find it hard to juggle a family and a career (= to arrange their lives so that they have time for both).
(Definition of juggle from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"juggle" in Business English

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juggleverb [I or T]

uk   us   /ˈdʒʌɡl/
to try to do two or more jobs or activities at the same time, because you do not have a lot of time: Senior executives are under pressure to juggle the increasing demands of their workload.juggle sth and/with sth Flexible working hours help staff juggle work and family life.
if you juggle data or resources, you use them in a way that will bring you an advantage or that may be dishonest: Analysts think the Treasury may be able to juggle its accounts for the next few months.
FINANCE to buy and sell shares, bonds, etc. on a regular basis in order to make a lot of money: While individual investors may be able to juggle asset allocation themselves, diversifying into 100 or more different assets usually requires a professional fund manager.
(Definition of juggle from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“juggle” in British English

“juggle” in Business English

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