jump Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “jump” in the English Dictionary

"jump" in British English

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jumpverb

uk   /dʒʌmp/  us   /dʒʌmp/
  • jump verb (IN THE AIR)

A2 [I] to ​push yourself ​suddenly off the ​ground and into the ​air using ​yourlegs: The ​children were jumping up and down with ​excitement. She ​ranacross the ​grass and jumped into the ​water. He had to jump out of an ​upstairswindow to ​escape. Our ​cat is always jumping up on/onto the ​furniture.
A2 [I or T] to ​push yourself ​suddenly off the ​ground in ​order to go over something: Can you jump over/​across this ​stream? All the ​horses are ​finding it ​difficult to jump the last ​fence.

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  • jump verb (MOVE/ACT SUDDENLY)

B1 [I usually + adv/prep] to ​move or ​actsuddenly or ​quickly: He ​suddenly jumped to his ​feet/jumped up and ​left. She jumped in/into a ​taxi and ​rushed to the ​station.
B2 [I] If a ​noise or ​actioncauses you to jump, ​yourbody makes a ​suddensharpmovement because of ​surprise or ​fear: The ​loudexplosion made everyone jump. I ​almost jumped out of my ​skin when I ​heard a ​loudcrashdownstairs.

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  • jump verb (INCREASE)

[I] to ​increasesuddenly by a ​largeamount: House ​prices have jumped dramatically. The ​cost of ​building the ​road has jumped by 70 ​percent.

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  • jump verb (SEQUENCE)

[I usually + adv/prep] If a ​story, ​film, ​play, etc. jumps, it ​movessuddenly between different ​parts of it: The ​movie is about his ​adultlife, but it ​keeps jumping (back) to when he was a ​child. His ​talk was hard to ​follow because he ​kept jumping from one ​subject to another.
  • jump verb (ATTACK)

[T] informal to ​attack someone ​suddenly: They were just ​walkinghome when a ​bunch of ​guys jumped (on) them.
  • jump verb (MOVE ILLEGALLY)

[T] to go past or away from something ​illegally or ​wrongly: The ​policevideoshowed that she had jumped the (​traffic) ​lights. Several ​sailors jumped ship (= ​lefttheirship without ​permission) in New York.
jump bail
to ​fail to ​appear for a ​courttrial after being ​released until the ​trial in ​exchange for ​payment: I'd never have ​thought Hugh would jump ​bail.

jumpnoun [C]

uk   /dʒʌmp/  us   /dʒʌmp/
  • jump noun [C] (MOVEMENT)

B1 a ​suddenmovement off the ​ground and into the ​air: He ​won with a jump of 8.5 ​metres. a ​parachute jump Several ​horsesfell at the last jump (= ​fence or other thing to be jumped over).
a ​suddensharpmovement because of ​surprise or ​fear: The ​doorslammed and Rita ​woke up with a jump.

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(Definition of jump from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"jump" in American English

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jumpverb

 us   /dʒʌmp/
  • jump verb (RAISE UP SUDDENLY)

[I/T] to ​push yourself off the ​ground and into the ​air using ​yourlegs and ​feet: [I] The ​kids were jumping up and down with ​excitement. [I] The ​cats jumped up onto the ​table.
[I/T] To jump sometimes ​means to ​lift yourself off the ​ground in ​order to go over something: [T] Can you jump this ​fence?
  • jump verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[I] to move ​suddenly or ​quickly: A man jumped out of the ​bushes. He jumped to his ​feet and ​ran out the ​door.
[I] If a ​noise or ​actioncauses you to jump, ​yourbody makes a ​suddenmovement because of ​surprise or ​fear: The ​thunder made us all jump.
jumps the light
If a ​car jumps the ​light, it ​startsmoving past a ​trafficlight while the ​light is still ​red.
  • jump verb (OMIT STAGES)

[I/T] to move up or go ​acrosssuddenly from one ​point or ​stage to another without ​stopping at the ​stages in between: [I always + adv/prep] Her ​book jumped from fifth ​place to first ​place on the best-seller ​list. [T] The ​forestfire jumped the ​road and ​spread to the other ​side.
jump to conclusions
If you jump to ​conclusions, you ​judge a ​situationquickly and ​emotionally without having all the ​facts: It’s not ​fair to jump to ​conclusions about a ​wholegroup of ​peoplebased on one ​incident.
  • jump verb (INCREASE)

[I] to ​increasesuddenly by a ​largeamount: Home ​prices in the ​area have jumped to an all-time high.
  • jump verb (ATTACK)

[T] infml to ​attacksuddenly: He was jumped and ​robbed by two ​guys on his way ​home from ​work.
Phrasal verbs

jumpnoun [C]

 us   /dʒʌmp/
  • jump noun [C] (RAISING UP SUDDENLY)

a ​push into the ​air from a ​surface, like the ​ground or ​ice, using ​yourlegs and ​feet: The skater’s jump was high but not ​graceful.
  • jump noun [C] (OMITTING STAGES)

a move from one ​point or ​stage to another without ​stopping at the ​stages in between: He made a ​big jump from ​generalmanager to ​president of the ​company.
(Definition of jump from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"jump" in Business English

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jumpverb [I]

uk   us   /dʒʌmp/
if ​prices, ​profits, ​shares, etc. jump, they ​increase by a large ​amount in a ​shortperiod of ​time: Interest ​rateslook set to jump over the coming months.jump from sth to sth The PMI ​index jumped from 54.5 to 56.1 in March, its ​highestlevel for six ​years. jump (by) 31%/98 points/€116, etc. The airline's full-year pre-tax ​profits jumped 56% despite the ​impact of ​higheroilprices. Overall music ​sales have jumped more than 19 ​percent in the last twelve months.
jump ship informal
to ​leave a ​company or ​organization in ​order to ​work for another, especially in ​order to get a ​highersalary or better ​workingconditions: Loyalty ​bonuses were ​paid to ​staff so they wouldn't jump ​ship.
jump on the bandwagon
to become involved in an ​activity that a lot of others are already involved in because it is ​successful: More and more ​companies have jumped on the ​broadbanddiscountbandwagon.

jumpnoun [C]

uk   us   /dʒʌmp/
a sudden large ​increase in the ​price, ​value, or ​amount of something: The ​techstocks in the ​indexposted the biggest jumps.a jump in sth Universities and colleges have ​reported a dramatic jump in the ​number of ​applications.a jump of 50%/150 points/€150, etc. Net ​casinorevenuesincreased by 19% to $41 million, a jump of 138% over the fourth ​quarter of 2008.a 25%/90 point/20 pence, etc. jump Heavyweight ​stock helped to ​drag the FTSE 100 ​higher with a 27.5p jump to 742p.a jump from sth The ​increase in ​homerepossessions, showing a 31% jump from last year's ​figures, is ​depressingpropertyvalues. a jump in ​profits/​sales/​inflation a ​big/​sharp/significant jump
get/have a jump on sb/sth US informal
to have an ​advantage over other ​companies or ​people: Big ​companies are always looking to get a jump on their ​rivals.
(Definition of jump from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“jump” in Business English

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