kick Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “kick” in the English Dictionary

"kick" in British English

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kickverb

uk   /kɪk/ us   /kɪk/
A1 [I or T] to hit someone or something with the foot, or to move the feet and legs suddenly and violently: I kicked the ball as hard as I could. He was accused of kicking a man in the face. She felt the baby kicking inside her.
[I] If a gun kicks, it jumps back suddenly and with force when the gun is fired.
be kicking yourself/could have kicked yourself
C2 used to say that you are very annoyed with yourself because you have done something stupid or missed a chance: When I realized what I'd done I could have kicked myself. They must be kicking themselves for selling their shares too early.

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kicknoun

uk   /kɪk/ us   /kɪk/
  • kick noun (STRONG FEELING)

C2 [C] a strong feeling of excitement and pleasure: I get a real kick out of winning a race. He was stealing stuff just for kicks (= because he thought it was exciting).
[C usually singular] informal the strong effect of an alcoholic drink: Watch out for the fruit punch, it has a real kick.
  • kick noun (INTEREST)

[C usually singular] informal a new interest, especially one that does not last long: He's on an exercise kick (= he exercises a lot) at the moment.
(Definition of kick from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"kick" in American English

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kickverb [I/T]

us   /kɪk/
to hit someone or something with the foot, or to move the feet and legs suddenly and violently: [T] I kicked the ball as hard as I could. [I] I kicked at the leaves, hoping to find the ring I dropped.

kicknoun

us   /kɪk/
  • kick noun (EXCITEMENT)

[C] a strong feeling of excitement and pleasure: We got a kick out of that show.
  • kick noun (INTEREST)

[C usually sing] a new interest, esp. one that does not last long: He’s been on an exercise kick lately.
(Definition of kick from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"kick" in Business English

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kickverb [T]

uk   /kɪk/ us  
kick sth into touch also kick sth into the long grass UK
to decide not to deal with a problem, or not deal with it immediately: They decided to kick the idea of introducing a congestion charge into touch.
kick the tyres UK US kick the tires
to try something or examine it carefully before you buy it: Come and kick the tires on this latest version of the software.
kick sb upstairs informal
to give someone a new job that seems more powerful but is really less powerful, usually in order to stop them causing trouble for you: He was a lousy salesman, so he was kicked upstairs to a desk job.
kick sth upstairs informal
to send information or a decision to someone in a higher position: We didn't have the authority to hire anyone, so the whole matter was kicked upstairs.
See also
(Definition of kick from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“kick” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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