knot Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “knot” in the English Dictionary

"knot" in British English

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knotnoun [C]

uk   /nɒt/ us   /nɑːt/
  • knot noun [C] (FASTENING)

C2 a join made by tying together the ends of a piece or pieces of string, rope, cloth, etc.: to tie a knot

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  • knot noun [C] (MEASUREMENT)

specialized sailing, engineering, environment a measure of the speed of ships, aircraft, or movements of water and air. One knot is one nautical mile per hour: a top speed of about 20 knots

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Idioms

knotverb

uk   /nɒt/ us   /nɑːt/ -tt-
(Definition of knot from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"knot" in American English

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knotnoun [C]

us   /nɑt/
  • knot noun [C] (FASTENING)

a fastening made by tying together a piece or pieces of string, rope, cloth, etc.: Wrap this string around the package and then tie a knot. fig. She’s so nervous, her stomach is in knots (= feels tight and uncomfortable).
  • knot noun [C] (GROUP)

a group of people or things: After the game, disappointed knots of people drifted away.
  • knot noun [C] (WOOD)

a hard, dark area on a tree or piece of wood where a branch was joined to the tree
  • knot noun [C] (MEASUREMENT)

a measure of speed for ships, aircraft, or movements of water and air equal to approximately 6076 feet (1.85 kilometers) an hour
knot
verb [I/T] us   /nɑt/ -tt-
[T] He knotted his tie carefully.
(Definition of knot from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"knot" in Business English

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knotnoun [C]

uk   /nɒt/ us  
MEASURES a measure of the speed of ships, aircraft, or movements of water and air. One knot is approximately 1.85 kilometres per hour: The flight takes an hour, flying at 140 knots.
tie the knot
if two or more companies tie the knot, they join to become one company: The two airline companies finally agreed to tie the knot after last-minute haggling over ownership.
(Definition of knot from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of knot?
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“knot” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
by ,
May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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biodegrade

to decay naturally and in a way that is not harmful

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decision fatigue noun
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