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Meaning of “knowledge” in the English Dictionary

"knowledge" in British English

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knowledgenoun

uk   /ˈnɒl.ɪdʒ/  us   /ˈnɑː.lɪdʒ/
B1 [S or U] understanding of or information about a subject that you get by experience or study, either known by one person or by people generally: Her knowledge of English grammar is very extensive. He has a limited knowledge of French. The details of the scandal are now common knowledge (= familiar to most people). She started to photograph the documents, safe in the knowledge that (= knowing that) she wouldn't be disturbed for at least an hour. In this town there are only a couple of restaurants that to my knowledge (= judging from my personal experience and information) serve good food.
[U] the state of knowing about or being familiar with something: They both deny all knowledge of the affair. It has come/been brought to our knowledge (= we have discovered) that several computers have gone missing.

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(Definition of knowledge from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"knowledge" in American English

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knowledgenoun [U]

 us   /ˈnɑl·ɪdʒ/
awareness, understanding, or information that has been obtained by experience or study, and that is either in a person’s mind or possessed by people generally: How will we use our increasing scientific knowledge? A lack of knowledge on the part of teachers is a real problem. He has a limited knowledge of French. The owner claims the boat was being used without her knowledge. It was common knowledge that Lucy was superstitious about the number 13.
(Definition of knowledge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"knowledge" in Business English

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knowledgenoun

uk   us   /ˈnɒlɪdʒ/
skill in, understanding of, or information about something, which a person gets by experience or study: acquire/gain/have knowledge possess/lack knowledge People working in stores need better product knowledge. business/scientific/technical knowledgedeny all/any knowledge of sth The chairman denies all knowledge of any foreign accounts. Applicants should have a working knowledge of computer-aided design systems. detailed/extensive/basic knowledge business/scientific/technical knowledge
to my knowledge (also to the best of my knowledge)
judging from my personal experience and information: To my knowledge, not one call was made to verify anything in my application for the job.
(Definition of knowledge from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“knowledge” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

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