knowledge Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “knowledge” in the English Dictionary

"knowledge" in British English

See all translations

knowledgenoun

uk   /ˈnɒl.ɪdʒ/  us   /ˈnɑː.lɪdʒ/
B1 [S or U] understanding of or ​information about a ​subject that you get by ​experience or ​study, either ​known by one ​person or by ​peoplegenerally: Her knowledge ofEnglishgrammar is very ​extensive. He has alimited knowledge ofFrench. The ​details of the ​scandal are now common knowledge (= ​familiar to most ​people). She ​started to ​photograph the ​documents, ​safe in the knowledge that (= ​knowing that) she wouldn't be ​disturbed for at least an ​hour. In this ​town there are only a ​couple of ​restaurants that to my knowledge (= ​judging from my ​personalexperience and ​information)serve good ​food. [U] the ​state of ​knowing about or being ​familiar with something: They both deny all knowledge of the ​affair. It has come/been ​brought to ​our knowledge (= we have ​discovered) that several ​computers have gone ​missing.
More examples
(Definition of knowledge from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"knowledge" in American English

See all translations

knowledgenoun [U]

 us   /ˈnɑl·ɪdʒ/
awareness, ​understanding, or ​information that has been ​obtained by ​experience or ​study, and that is either in a person’s ​mind or ​possessed by ​peoplegenerally: How will we use ​ourincreasingscientific knowledge? A ​lack of knowledge on the ​part of ​teachers is a ​realproblem. He has a ​limited knowledge of ​French. The ​ownerclaims the ​boat was being used without her knowledge. It was ​common knowledge that Lucy was ​superstitious about the ​number 13.
(Definition of knowledge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"knowledge" in Business English

See all translations

knowledgenoun

uk   us   /ˈnɒlɪdʒ/
skill in, ​understanding of, or ​information about something, which a ​person gets by ​experience or ​study: acquire/​gain/have knowledge possess/​lack knowledge People ​working in ​stores need better product knowledge. business/scientific/​technical knowledgedeny all/any knowledge of sth The ​chairman denies all knowledge of any ​foreignaccounts. Applicants should have a ​working knowledge ofcomputer-aideddesignsystems. detailed/extensive/basic knowledge business/scientific/​technical knowledge
to my knowledge (also to the best of my knowledge) judging from my ​personalexperience and ​information: To my knowledge, not one ​call was made to ​verify anything in my ​application for the ​job.
(Definition of knowledge from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of knowledge?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day
coeducational

having male and female students being taught together in the same school or college rather than separately

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More