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Meaning of “label” in the English Dictionary

"label" in British English

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labelnoun [C]

uk   /ˈleɪ.bəl/ us   /ˈleɪ.bəl/
  • label noun [C] (SIGN)

B1 a piece of paper or other material that gives you information about the object it is attached to: Remember to put some address labels on the suitcases. Washing instructions should be on the label.
C2 a word or a phrase that is used to describe the characteristics or qualities of people, activities, or things, often in a way that is unfair: He seems to be stuck with the label of "troublemaker".

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  • label noun [C] (COMPANY)

B1 a company that produces goods for sale, the goods themselves, or the company's name or symbol: Her favourite designer label (= maker of expensive clothes) is Armani. Their own-label vegetarian products have been a huge success. The group have just signed (= arranged to record) with a new record label.

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labelverb [T]

uk   /ˈleɪ.bəl/ us   /ˈleɪ.bəl/ -ll- or US usually -l-
C1 to fasten a label to: [+ adj] The parcel was clearly labelled "Fragile". If you spend any time in prison, you're labelled as a criminal for the rest of your life.

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(Definition of label from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"label" in American English

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labelnoun [C]

us   /ˈleɪ·bəl/
a piece of paper or other material that gives information about the object it is attached to: the address/mailing label Follow the instructions on the label.
A label can also mean the name or symbol of a company that produces goods for sale: Everything we produce goes out under our own label.
A label can also be a name or a phrase used to describe the characteristics or qualities of people, activities, or things: It’s hard to say whether to apply the label “jazz” or “rock” to her music.

labelverb [T]

us   /ˈleɪ·bəl/
to attach a piece of paper or other material that has information about an object to that object: She labeled all the packages and sent them out the same afternoon.
To label something or someone is also to name that thing’s or person’s character: He didn’t want to be labeled a complainer, so he didn’t raise any objection to the extra work.
(Definition of label from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"label" in Business English

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labelnoun [C]

uk   /ˈleɪbəl/ us   COMMERCE, MARKETING
a piece of paper or other material that gives you information about the object that it is fixed to: address/price/warning label Canada put graphic warning labels on cigarette packs back in June 2001. Food packages that did not carry a label certifying them as safe were being blocked from export. Launder or dry-clean, according to the care label. Check the sodium levels on the food label.
a company that produces goods for sale, using a particular name: designer/fashion label She also has plans to launch a range of cosmetics if her fashion label takes off.
a name of a record company: an independent/record/major label
a name of a company that makes wine: Among its other big deals this year was the purchase of two champagne labels.
a name or symbol that is used by a company to sell its products, or the products themselves: Contaminated wheat gluten made its way into pet food sold under nearly 100 labels across North America.

labelverb [T]

uk   /ˈleɪbəl/ us   UK -ll-, US -l-
COMMERCE, MARKETING to fasten a label to something, or write information on something: All food products are labelled with their price and country of origin.be labelled as sth Only clothes with a UPF of 15 to 50-plus may be labeled as sun-protective. Processed foods must be clearly labeled to indicate fat, sugar, and salt content for shoppers.
to describe someone or something using a particular word or phrase, often unfairly: She doesn't like being labelled as a "woman director", saying she's just a director who happens to be a woman.
(Definition of label from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“label” in British English

“label” in American English

“label” in Business English

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