labour Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “labour” in the English Dictionary

"labour" in British English

See all translations

labournoun

UK (US labor) uk   /ˈleɪ.bər/  us   /-bɚ/
  • labour noun (WORK)

C1 [U] practicalwork, ​especially when it ​involves hard ​physicaleffort: The ​carparts themselves are not ​expensive, it's the labour that ​costs the ​money. manual labour (= hard ​work using the ​hands)C1 [U] workers, ​especiallypeople who do ​practicalwork with ​theirhands: skilled/​unskilled labourlabours [plural] literary all the ​effort and hard ​work that have been ​involved in doing a ​particularpiece of ​work: Are you ​tired after ​your labours? West was ​paid very little for his labours. Retirement is the ​time to ​enjoy the ​fruits ofyour labours.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • labour noun (BIRTH)

C2 [C or U] the last ​stage of ​pregnancy from the ​time when the ​muscles of the wombstart to ​push the ​baby out of the ​body until the ​babyappears: labour ​pains She went into (= ​started) labour at twelve o'clock last ​night. I was in labour for twelve ​hours with my first ​baby. No two labours are ​ever the same.

labourverb

UK (US labor) uk   /ˈleɪ.bər/  us   /-bɚ/

Labournoun [+ sing/pl verb]

uk   /ˈleɪ.bər/  us   /-bɚ/
the Labour Party, the ​politicalparty in Great ​Britain that ​believes in ​social equality, a more ​equalsharing out of wealth, and the ​rights of ​workers: Labour are ​sure to get in at the next ​election. I ​voted Labour in the last ​election.

Labouradjective

uk   /ˈleɪ.bər/  us   /-bɚ/
belonging or ​relating to the Labour Party: the Labour Party Labour ​voters the Labour ​candidate
(Definition of labour from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"labour" in Business English

See all translations

labournoun [U]

UK (US labor) uk   us   /ˈleɪbər/
practical ​work, especially involving ​physicaleffort: The ​cost will depend on the ​amount of labour involved. They gave us an ​estimatedpriceincluding parts and labour. The ​shortssell for $45, but the hard labor of the women who made them ​cost just 50 ​cents. Most ​jobs these days aren't ​exhausting manual labour.
HR workers in a ​company or a country, especially ​people who do practical ​work with their ​hands: skilled/unskilled labour Foreign ​workers were ​brought in to ​fill a ​temporaryshortfall in ​skilled labor. We use casual labour during ​busyperiods. cheap/​local/​temporary labour More ​companies are ​buildingplants abroad to take ​advantage of ​cheaper labor ​costs. labour ​disputes/​shortages/​standards
withdraw your labour UK HR to ​stopworking as a way of ​complaining about or ​trying to ​change something, such as ​pay or ​workingconditions: The ​pilots have chosen to ​withdraw their labour at a crucial ​time in the airline's ​history.
(Definition of labour from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of labour?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“labour” in Business English

Word of the Day

drum

a musical instrument, especially one made from a skin stretched over the end of a hollow tube or bowl, played by hitting with the hand or a stick

Word of the Day

I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
by Kate Woodford,
February 10, 2016
On this blog, we like to look at words and phrases in the English language that learners often have difficulty with. Two phrases that can be confused are ‘used to do something’ and ‘be used to something/doing something’. People often use one phrase when they mean the other, or they use the wrong

Read More 

farecasting noun
farecasting noun
February 08, 2016
predicting the optimum date to buy a plane ticket, especially on a website or using an app A handful of new and updated websites and apps are trying to perfect the art of what’s known as farecasting – predicting the best date to buy a ticket.

Read More