laden Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “laden” in the English Dictionary

"laden" in British English

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ladenadjective

uk   us   /ˈleɪ.dən/
(Definition of laden from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"laden" in American English

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ladenadjective

 us   /ˈleɪ·dən/
carrying or ​holding a lot of something: a ​table laden with ​food
(Definition of laden from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"laden" in Business English

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ladenadjective

uk   us   /ˈleɪdən/
TRANSPORT carrying something: laden with sth a ​truck laden with ​timber When fully laden with ​pallets, the ​vehicles will be at exactly the ​right height for the ​unloadingdocks.
having a lot of something, especially something unpleasant such as ​debt: The ​banks are laden with ​badloans. The Nasdaq ​index is heavily laden with ​technologystocks.
-laden used in adjectives to show that something has or is ​carrying a lot of something: debt-laden ​banks They were ​accused of ​driving waste-laden ​trucks with no ​cover over them.
laden in bulk TRANSPORT a ​ship that is laden in ​bulk is ​carryinggoodsloose, not in containers (= very large metal ​boxes)
(Definition of laden from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “laden”
in Spanish cargado (de)…
in Vietnamese chất đầy…
in Malaysian sarat…
in Thai ภาระหนัก…
in French chargé…
in German beladen…
in Chinese (Simplified) 负重的, 装满的,载满的…
in Indonesian sarat…
in Chinese (Traditional) 負重的, 裝滿的,載滿的…
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“laden” in Business English

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