laissez-faire Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “laissez-faire” in the English Dictionary

"laissez-faire" in British English

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laissez-fairenoun [U]

uk   /ˌleɪ.seɪˈfeər/  us   /-ˈfer/
unwillingness to get ​involved in or ​influence other people's ​activities: The ​problemsbeganlong before he ​becameCEO, but they ​worsened with his laissez-faire approach/​attitude. If a ​government is laissez-faire, it does not have many ​laws and ​rules that ​control the ​buying and ​selling of ​goods and ​services.
(Definition of laissez-faire from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"laissez-faire" in American English

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laissez-fairenoun [U]

(also laisser faire)  us   /ˌles·eɪˈfeər, ˌleɪ·seɪ-/
politics & government an ​economictheory or ​plan in which a ​government does not have many ​laws or ​rules to ​control the ​buying and ​selling of ​goods and ​services
(Definition of laissez-faire from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"laissez-faire" in Business English

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laissez-fairenoun [U]

(also laisser-faire) uk   us  
ECONOMICS, GOVERNMENT the ​idea that ​businesses should be ​free to ​develop without the involvement or ​control of ​government: Those who ​subscribe to ​absolute laissez-faire ​economics, or no ​governmentregulation, are sometimes referred to as ​economic anarchists.
the ​idea that ​people should be ​free to choose how to do things, without too much ​control from someone in ​authority: If you choose a laissez-faire ​managementstyle, you give your ​staffroom to make their own decisions.
(Definition of laissez-faire from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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