lame duck Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “lame duck” in the English Dictionary

"lame duck" in American English

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lame ducknoun [C]

 us   /ˈleɪm ˈdʌk/
a ​person who still has ​time to ​serve in an ​electedpositiondespite not being ​elected again in a ​recentelection, with the ​result that the ​person has no ​realpower
(Definition of lame duck from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"lame duck" in Business English

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lame ducknoun [C]

uk   us  
an unsuccessful ​person, thing, or ​organization: A lot of ​time and ​effort goes into ​supportingemployees who are essentially lame ducks. This is regarded by many as a lame-duck ​initiative that has ​failed to ​deliver its promises.
POLITICS an ​electedofficial whose ​power is ​reduced because the ​person who will ​replace them has already been ​elected: The two ​years he has before he's perceived as a lame duck will be the most powerful ​period of his presidency.
a ​person in a ​position of ​authority in a ​company or ​organization whose ​power is ​reduced because their ​time in the ​job is about to end: It's frustrating that the ​present MD is a lame duck and can't really ​change anything very much.
(Definition of lame duck from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “lame duck”
in Chinese (Simplified) 不成功的, 不太成功的人(或事物)…
in Chinese (Traditional) 不成功的, 不太成功的人(或事物)…
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“lame duck” in British English

“lame duck” in Business English

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