landing Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “landing” in the English Dictionary

"landing" in British English

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landingnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈlæn.dɪŋ/
  • landing noun [C] (PLANE/BOAT)

B2 the ​fact of an ​aircraftarriving on the ​ground or a ​boatreachingland: One ​person has ​died after the ​pilot of a ​lightaircraft was ​forced to make a crash/​emergency landing in a ​field.

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  • landing noun [C] (FLOOR)

an ​area of ​floor that ​joins two sets of ​stairs or that ​leads from the ​top of a set of ​stairs to ​rooms
(Definition of landing from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"landing" in American English

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landingnoun [C]

 us   /ˈlæn·dɪŋ/
  • landing noun [C] (BUILDING)

a ​floor between two sets of ​stairs or at the ​top of a set of ​stairs: There is another ​bathroom on the landing between the first and second ​floors.
(Definition of landing from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"landing" in Business English

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landingnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈlændɪŋ/
TRANSPORT the ​act of an ​aircraft arriving on the ​ground, or of a boat ​reachingland: The ​plane made a ​safe landing on Lake Michigan beach. The ​pilot was ​cleared for an emergency landing after ​reporting smoke in the cockpit.
TRANSPORT, COMMERCE the ​act of taking ​goods off an ​aircraft or boat, or the ​amounts that are taken off: His ​job is to ​supervise the ​loading and landing of ​goods at the quayside. Records of fish and shellfish landings must be ​submitted to the ​authorities that are ​monitoring fish ​stocks.
(Definition of landing from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“landing” in British English

“landing” in Business English

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