later Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “later” in the English Dictionary

"later" in British English

See all translations

lateradverb

uk   /ˈleɪ.tər/  us   /-t̬ɚ/
A2 at a ​time in the ​future or after the ​time you have ​mentioned: He'll be back later. We could always go later in the ​season. Police ​questioned him and he was later ​arrested.later on B1 at a ​time in the ​future, or after the ​time you have ​mentioned: What are you doing later on this ​evening? Shall I go and ​fetch her later on? Later on, we could go and have a ​meal if you like.no/not later than not after: She said she'd ​prefer us to ​arrive no later than nine o'clock.

lateradjective [before noun]

uk   /ˈleɪ.tər/  us   /-t̬ɚ/
B2 happening at a ​time in the ​future, or after the ​time you have ​mentioned: We could ​catch a later ​train. You can always ​changeyourpassword at a later ​date.
C2 more ​modern or ​recent: Later ​versions of the ​software are much ​better. Later ​modelsincluded a 2.5 ​litreengine. I ​prefer her ​earlierpaintings to her later ​work.

laterexclamation

uk   /ˈleɪ.tər/  us   /-t̬ɚ/ (also laters) informal
a way of saying ​goodbye: Laters, Mike.
(Definition of later from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"later" in American English

See all translations

lateradverb

 us   /ˈleɪ·t̬ər/
  • later adverb (NEAR THE END)

comparative oflate : He was ​successful later in his ​career.
  • later adverb (AFTER)

after the ​present, ​expected, or ​usualtime; comparative oflate : She said she would ​speak to me later. Why don’t you ​call back later on, when he’s ​sure to be here?
(Definition of later from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of later?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“later” in American English

Word of the Day

costume

the set of clothes typical of a particular country or period of history, or suitable for a particular activity

Word of the Day

I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
by Kate Woodford,
February 10, 2016
On this blog, we like to look at words and phrases in the English language that learners often have difficulty with. Two phrases that can be confused are ‘used to do something’ and ‘be used to something/doing something’. People often use one phrase when they mean the other, or they use the wrong

Read More 

farecasting noun
farecasting noun
February 08, 2016
predicting the optimum date to buy a plane ticket, especially on a website or using an app A handful of new and updated websites and apps are trying to perfect the art of what’s known as farecasting – predicting the best date to buy a ticket.

Read More