Meaning of “launch” in the English Dictionary

"launch" in English

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launchnoun [ C ]

uk /lɔːntʃ/ us /lɑːntʃ/

launch noun [ C ] (EVENT)

C1 an event to celebrate or introduce something new:

How much champagne will we need for the launch?
Illness prevented her attending the launch party for her latest novel.

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launchverb

uk /lɔːntʃ/ us /lɑːntʃ/

launch verb (BEGIN)

B2 [ I or T ] to begin something such as a plan or introduce something new such as a product:

The programme was launched a year ago.
The airline will launch its new transatlantic service next month.
A devastating attack was launched on the rebel stronghold.
[ + adv/prep ] UK After working for the company for several years she decided to launch out on her own and set up in business.

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launch verb (SEND)

C1 [ T ] to send something out, such as a new ship into the water or a spacecraft into space:

A spokesman for the dockyard said they hoped to launch the first submarine within two years.
to launch a missile
launch yourself mainly UK

to jump with great force:

The defender launched himself at the attacking player, bringing him to the ground.

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Phrasal verb(s)

(Definition of “launch” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"launch" in American English

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launchverb

us /lɔntʃ, lɑntʃ/

launch verb (SEND)

[ T ] to send something out, esp. a vehicle into space or a ship onto water:

On the last shuttle mission, the crew launched a communications satellite.

launch verb (BEGIN)

[ I/T ] to begin, or to introduce a new plan or product:

[ T ] We’re planning to launch a new Internet services company next month.
[ I always + adv/prep ] He launched into a verbal attack on her handling of the finances.

launchnoun

us /lɔntʃ, lɑntʃ/

launch noun (BOAT)

launch noun (BEGINNING)

[ C usually sing ] an introduction of a new plan or product:

Frank went to the launch of Hibichu’s new flat-screen TV.

launch noun (SEND)

[ C ] an act of sending something out, esp. a vehicle into space or a ship onto water:

The launch of the space shuttle was delayed by bad weather.

(Definition of “launch” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"launch" in Business English

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launchnoun [ C ]

uk /lɔːnʃ/ us

MARKETING the introduction of a new product or service for sale to the public:

Since its launch, the game console has sold 6.7 million units around the world.
brand/product launch The secret to a successful brand launch is planning.
launch date/event/party The company has not finalized the exact pricing structure or set a launch date.
delay/postpone a launch Bugs in the operating system delayed its launch six months.
attend/celebrate/mark a launch The event was held to mark the launch of a new online service.
announce/oversee/plan a launch
imminent/planned/successful launch

the beginning of something new, such as a plan, business, or job:

campaign/career launch It's a fresh start for the lead singer and a career launch for the artists involved.

launchverb [ I or T ]

uk /lɔːnʃ/ us

to begin something new such as a plan or business:

launch a bid/company He has not ruled out launching a takeover bid for the company.
launch an inquiry/investigation When an investigation was launched into the deal, two cofounders resigned.
launch an assault/attack/offensive The administration launched an attack on organized software piracy.
launch a campaign/initiative/scheme We launched a campaign to fight world hunger.
launch a site/website

MARKETING to introduce a new product or service for sale:

The manufacturer has launched a new car, which will go on sale this spring.
launch a product/range The jeweller is about to launch a range at a well-known department store.

to start a new job, to start work in a new industry, or to start a new part of your work life:

Michael launched his career as a software salesman.
launch sb/yourself as sth She launched herself as a designer of high-end handbags.

(Definition of “launch” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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launch

Public resources will be needed to launch proactive policies and to ensure those in danger of being excluded from the labour market are drawn into it.
There is a fundamental need to launch training offensives in order to eliminate the shortage of skilled labour which is used to justify the present state of affairs.
Let us all turn our attention to tightening up the hurdles which we need to leap over before we actually launch initiatives.
In the field of defence, the last few days have brought the launch of an initiative that could take us far.
We estimate that from the moment the decision on the budget is made we will need about 18 months to launch the new generation of cohesion programmes and projects.
We have spearheaded the important agreements reached this year to reduce debt and launch global immunisation programmes against illnesses and diseases in the poorest countries.
If, therefore, we can point the finger at those responsible for this ongoing ecological disaster, we will be in a position to launch a really ambitious policy.
In fact it is our duty to launch an extensive review of the education of children on our planet if we want a better future for all.
We can launch a debate on that but clearly it is too complex a question to resolve in the next six months.
We will launch a broad and open consultation process in order to get the views of all the different parties interested.