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Meaning of “lean” in the English Dictionary

"lean" in British English

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leanverb [I or T, usually + adv/prep]

uk   /liːn/  us   /liːn/ (leaned or UK also leant, leaned or UK also leant)
B2 to (​cause to) ​slope in one ​direction, or to ​move the ​toppart of the ​body in a ​particulardirection: She leaned ​forward and ​whispered something in my ​ear. I ​sat down next to Bernard, who leaned over to me and said "You're late." Lean ​yourhead back a little. That ​fence is leaning to the ​right.

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leanadjective

uk   /liːn/  us   /liːn/
  • lean adjective (NOT ENOUGH)

If a ​period of ​time is lean, there is not enough of something, ​especiallymoney or ​food, at that ​time: It has been a ​particularly lean ​year for the ​educationdepartment.
(Definition of lean from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"lean" in American English

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leanverb [I/T]

 us   /lin/ (past tense and past participle leaned  /lind/ )
to move ​yourbody away from a ​verticalposition so that it is ​bentforward or ​resting against something, or to ​place something in a ​slopingposition against something: [I always + adv/prep] The ​conductor leaned over us and ​asked for ​ourtickets. [I always + adv/prep] She paused for a ​moment to ​rest and leaned against a ​largerock. [T] He leaned his ​bike against the ​wall.

leanadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /lin/
(of a ​person) ​thin and in good ​physicalcondition: Her ​body is lean, ​taut, ​athletic.
When you ​describemeat as lean, you ​mean that it does not have much ​fat in it: lean ​hamburgermeat
A lean ​period is a ​time during which there is not enough of something, esp. ​money or ​food: It is a ​particularly lean ​year for ​sciencefunding.
When you say that a ​company or ​business is lean, you ​mean that it has the fewest employees it ​needs to do ​itswork.
(Definition of lean from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"lean" in Business English

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leanadjective

uk   us   /liːn/
MANAGEMENT using fewer ​employees or less ​money in ​order to ​decreasewaste, while continuing to ​operateeffectively: Companies are ​downsizing, ​aiming to be leaner and more ​efficient, with ​demands on ​employees for greater ​productivity. With the ​application of lean ​managementprinciples, ​suppliers and ​distributors have ​streamlined their ​processes.lean enterprise/operation/organization When it comes to ​costs, they pride themselves on ​running a lean ​operation.get/become leaner The pack-houses and their ​workers have had to become leaner. lean ​retailers/​suppliers
if a ​period of ​time is lean, there is not enough ​money or ​business at that ​time: lean ​period/​times/​years Funding has been ​increased to some ​programs suffering from several ​years of lean ​budgets.
if ​costs, ​goods for ​sale, ​materials, or ​quantities of ​workers are lean, they are very ​low, or ​kept as ​low as possible: Cold ​weather across the U.S. ​signaled a ​surge in ​demand for ​naturalgasproducts at a ​time when ​inventories are uncomfortably lean. Working quickly and ​cheaply, with lean ​staffs and ​even leaner ​budgets, ​contractmanufacturers have ​long played a ​supporting role in the ​computerbusiness.
leanness
noun [U]
Leanness ​meanseliminating all ​waste, ​includingtime, and ensuring a ​smooth and ​predictableoutput.
(Definition of lean from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“lean” in American English

“lean” in Business English

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