leap Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “leap” in the English Dictionary

"leap" in British English

See all translations

leapverb [I + adv/prep]

uk   us   /liːp/ (leaped or leapt, leaped or leapt)

leap verb [I + adv/prep] (MOVE SUDDENLY)

C2 to make a ​largejump or ​suddenmovement, usually from one ​place to another: He leaped out of his ​car and ​ran towards the ​house. I leaped up to ​answer the ​phone. The ​dog leaped over the ​gate into the ​field.
More examples

leap verb [I + adv/prep] (HAPPEN SUDDENLY)

to ​providehelp, ​protection, etc. very ​quickly: He leaped to his friend's ​defence. Scott leapt to the ​rescue when he ​spotted the ​youngster in ​difficulty. Mr Davies leaped in to ​explain. to ​achieve something ​suddenly, usually fame, ​power, or ​importance: He leapt tofame after his ​appearance in a Broadway ​play. to ​increase, ​improve, or ​grow very ​quickly: Shares in the ​company leaped 250 ​percent.

leapnoun [C]

uk   us   /liːp/

leap noun [C] (SUDDEN CHANGE)

C2 a ​bigchange, ​increase, or ​improvement: a leap in ​profits It ​takesquite a leap of the ​imagination to ​believe that it's the same ​person.

leap noun [C] (MOVEMENT)

a ​largejump or ​suddenmovement: With one leap he ​crossed the ​stream.
(Definition of leap from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"leap" in American English

See all translations

leapverb [I/T]

 us   /lip/ (past tense and past participle leaped  /lipt, lept/ or leapt  /lept/ )
to make a ​largejump or ​suddenmovement, or to ​jump over something: [I] He leaps to his ​feet when the ​phonerings. [I] Flames were leaping into the ​sky. [T] The ​dog leaped the ​fence. [I] fig.Americanswantchange, but they don’t ​want to leap into the ​unknown (= move ​quickly into ​unknownsituations). If ​yourheart leaps, you have a ​sudden, ​strongfeeling of ​pleasure or ​fear: [I] My ​heart leaps when I ​hear his ​voice.
Phrasal verbs

leapnoun [C]

 us   /lip/
a ​largejump
(Definition of leap from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"leap" in Business English

See all translations

leapverb [I]

uk   us   /liːp/ (leapt or leaped /lept/ , leapt or leaped /lept/ )
to ​increase, ​improve, or ​grow very quickly: exports/prices/profits leap Property ​prices have leapt over 30% in the past ​year.leap (to sth) The company's ​shares leapt 17.5p to 210p.

leapnoun [C]

uk   us   /liːp/
a ​bigchange, ​increase, or ​improvement: a leap in costs/profits/sales The ​softwaredesigner should ​report a near 40% leap in ​profits to around £124m.a leap forward for sb/sth This ​launchrepresents a great leap ​forward for the ​company.a 20%/40%/75%, etc. leap The ​healthinsurancegiantreported a 20% leap in pre-tax ​profits for the ​year.
See also
(Definition of leap from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of leap?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day
faith school

a school that is financially supported by a particular religious group, usually for children from that religion

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More