loan Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “loan” in the English Dictionary

"loan" in British English

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loannoun

uk   /ləʊn/  us   /loʊn/

loan noun (SUM)

B1 [C] an ​amount of ​money that is ​borrowed, often from a ​bank, and has to be ​paid back, usually together with an ​extraamount of ​money that you have to ​pay as a ​charge for ​borrowing: She's ​trying to get a $50,000 loan to ​start her own ​business. We could apply for/take out a loan to ​buy a ​car.
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loan noun (BORROW)

C1 [C or U] an ​act of ​borrowing or ​lending something: Thank you very much for the loan ofyourbike. This ​exhibit is on loan (= being ​borrowed/​lent) from/to another ​museum.
on loan If a ​footballplayer is on loan, they are ​playing for a different ​club for a ​limitedperiod of ​time: He ​spent a ​month on loan at Newcastle.

loanverb [T]

uk   /ləʊn/  us   /loʊn/
to ​lend: This ​library loans ​books and CDs. [+ two objects] I'd loan you the ​money if I could./I'd loan the ​money to you if I could.
(Definition of loan from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"loan" in American English

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loannoun [C/U]

 us   /loʊn/
an ​act of ​lending something, esp. a ​sum of ​money that that has to be ​paid back with interest (= an ​additionalamount of ​money that is a ​percentage of the ​amountborrowed), or an ​amount of ​money that has been ​lent: [U] Thanks for the loan of ​yourbike. [C] My ​brotherrepaid his ​student loan within five ​years. The ​painting is on loan to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (= has been ​lent to it, esp. for more than a ​shortperiod of ​time).

loanverb [T]

 us   /loʊn/
to ​lend something, esp. ​money: Can you loan me $10 until ​payday?
(Definition of loan from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"loan" in Business English

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loannoun [C]

uk   us   /ləʊn/ FINANCE
money that someone ​borrows from a ​bank or other ​financialorganization for a ​period of ​time during which they ​payinterest: a loan to sb/sth The bank's ​portfolio of loans to ​commercial and ​industrialfirmsshrank from $15.7 ​billion the previous ​year to $12.7 ​billion.get/take out/apply for a loan Before you take out a loan sit down and ​list all the ​money you have coming in.pay off/pay back/repay a loan New ​restrictionsrequirelenders to ​check a person's ​income and ​ability to ​repay the loan.provide/give/make a loan World ​banksinjected as much as $64 ​billion into ​globalmoneymarkets to encourage ​banks to make loans again. approve/​refuse a loan a low-interest/fixed-rate/interest-only loan Banks and particularly ​buildingsocieties expect the ​amount of loans in ​arrears to ​increase.

loanverb [T]

uk   us   /ləʊn/
to ​lend someone something: loan sb sth/loan sth to sb The ​financereport showed that a ​wealthydonor had loaned his ​campaign $1.15 million. Lenders who loaned ​money for more than ​houses were ​worth have become victims of the ​economicdownturn.
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(Definition of loan from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “loan”
in Korean 대출…
in Arabic قَرْض…
in Malaysian pinjaman, meminjamkan…
in French prêt…
in Russian заем, ссуда…
in Chinese (Traditional) 數目, 貸款,借款…
in Italian prestito…
in Turkish borç para, ödünç para, kredi…
in Polish kredyt, pożyczka…
in Spanish préstamo, empréstito…
in Vietnamese tiền cho vay, sự vay…
in Portuguese empréstimo…
in Thai การให้ยืม, การให้กู้…
in German die Anleihe, das Darlehen, das Leihen…
in Catalan préstec…
in Japanese 借金, ローン…
in Chinese (Simplified) 数目, 贷款,借款…
in Indonesian pinjaman…
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