locker Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “locker” in the English Dictionary

"locker" in British English

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lockernoun [C]

uk   /ˈlɒk.ər/  us   /ˈlɑː.kɚ/
a ​cupboard, often ​tall and made of ​metal, in which you can ​keepyour possessions, and ​leave them for a ​period of ​time: We had several ​hours to ​wait for ​ourtrain, so we ​leftourbags in a (​luggage) locker, and went to ​look around the ​town.
(Definition of locker from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"locker" in American English

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lockernoun [C]

 us   /ˈlɑ·kər/
a ​cabinet, often ​tall and made of ​metal, in which someone can ​lock his or her possessions and ​leave them for a ​period of ​time
(Definition of locker from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"locker" in Business English

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lockernoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈlɒkər/ WORKPLACE
one of a set of ​tall metal cupboards that are fastened to a ​wall and can be locked, in which ​employees, ​students, etc. can ​leave their possessions: Nine ​employees had been ​laid off and were cleaning out their lockers.
(Definition of locker from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “locker”
in Arabic خِزانة…
in Korean 자물쇠…
in Portuguese armário com chave…
in Catalan armariet…
in Japanese ロッカー…
in Chinese (Simplified) 衣物存放柜,衣物柜…
in Turkish (okul, spor salonu vb.) eşya dolabı…
in Russian запирающийся шкафчик…
in Chinese (Traditional) 衣物存放櫃,衣物櫃…
in Italian armadietto (di spogliatoio)…
in Polish szafka…
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