log Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “log” in the English Dictionary

"log" in British English

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lognoun [C]

uk   /lɒɡ/  us   /lɑːɡ/

log noun [C] (WOOD)

C1 a ​thickpiece of ​tree trunk or ​branch, ​especially one ​cut for ​burning on a ​fire
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log noun [C] (RECORD)

a ​full written ​record of a ​journey, a ​period of ​time, or an ​event: the ship's log

log noun [C] (NUMBER)

informal for logarithm

logverb

uk   /lɒɡ/  us   /lɑːɡ/ (-gg-)

log verb (CUT WOOD)

[I or T] to ​cut down ​trees so that you can use ​theirwood: The ​forest has been so ​heavily logged that it is in ​danger of ​disappearing.

log verb (RECORD)

[T] to ​officiallyrecord something: The Better Business Bureau has logged more than 90 ​complaints. [T] (UK also log up) to ​travel and ​record a ​particulardistance
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of log from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"log" in American English

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lognoun [C]

 us   /lɔɡ, lɑɡ/

log noun [C] (WOOD)

a ​thickpiece of ​treetrunk or ​branch: Stack the logs near the ​fireplace.

log noun [C] (RECORD)

a ​full, written ​record of a ​trip, a ​period of ​time, or an ​event: a ship’s log

logverb

 us   /lɔɡ, lɑɡ/ (-gg-)

log verb (RECORD)

[T] to put ​information into a written ​record: [T] The ​police have logged several ​complaints about ​loudparties in that ​building. [T] He has logged over 1500 ​hours of ​flyingtime (= ​flown and ​recorded this ​amount).

log verb (WOOD)

[I/T] to ​cut down ​trees for ​theirwood, or to ​removetrees from a ​place by ​cutting them down: [T] Timber ​companies logged these ​mountains for ​years. [T] The Bureau of Land Management is ​reviewingplans to log more ​trees in Western Oregon.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of log from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"log" in Business English

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logverb [T]

uk   us   /lɒɡ/ (-gg-)
to write something down to make an ​officialrecord of it: log sth in/into sth Supervisors log an employee's driver's ​licensenumber into a ​database.log a call/claim/complaint During the first seven months of the ​year, the ​company logged 170 ​complaints.
to ​manage to do or get a particular ​number of something, especially a large ​number: The ​company has logged about 550 ​orders for new ​aircraft this ​year.
Phrasal verbs

lognoun [C]

uk   us   /lɒɡ/ (also log book)
an ​officialrecord of something: keep a log (of sth) You should ​keep a log of your ​businesstravel to ensure you have ​proof of your ​expenses.a user/visitor log The ​securityguardwrote our ​names in the visitor log.a learning/maintenance/production log The repairmen ​keep detailedmaintenance log ​books. a flight/ship's loga daily/weekly/monthly log Project ​managers are ​instructed to ​keep a ​daily log of their ​activities.
(Definition of log from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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