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Meaning of “long” in the English Dictionary

"long" in British English

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longadjective

uk   /lɒŋ/ us   /lɑːŋ/
  • long adjective (TIME)

A1 continuing for a large amount of time: a long film/meeting I've been waiting a long time. It's a long time since I worked there. Apparently the sessions are an hour long.

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  • long adjective (DISTANCE)

A1 being a distance between two points that is more than average or usual: long hair long legs a long dress There was a long queue at the post office. We're still a long way from the station.

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  • long adjective (MANY WORDS)

A2 used to describe a piece of writing that has a lot of pages or words: a long letter/book/report

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longadverb

uk   /lɒŋ/ us   /lɑːŋ/
  • long adverb (TIME)

A2 used to mean "(for) a long time", especially in questions and negative sentences: Have you been waiting (for) long? I'm just writing a letter but it won't take long. How long have you been in England? Don't rush - take as long as you like. We've been walking all day long. I've known her longer than you have. I won't be staying much longer.
C2 a long period of time before or after something: She left the house long before I arrived. It wasn't long before he was back with his family. He did not join them until long after they had eaten.
used with the past participle or the -ing form of the verb to mean that a state or activity has continued for a long time: a long-awaited letter long-serving employees

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  • long adverb (IF)

as/so long as

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B1 used to say that something must happen before something else can happen: I can come as long as I can leave by 4.00. Bring your friends by all means - just so long as I know how many are coming.
Grammar

longverb

uk   /lɒŋ/ us   /lɑːŋ/ formal

longnoun

uk   /lɒŋ/ us   /lɑːŋ/

long.noun [U]

written abbreviation for longitude
(Definition of long from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"long" in American English

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longadjective [-er/-est only]

us   /lɔŋ/
being a distance between two points that is more than average or usual, or being of a particular length: There was a long line at the post office. When I was young I wore my hair long. We’re still a long way from the station (= a great distance).
A long piece of writing, such as a book or story, has many words: It’s a long book – over 600 pages.
Long underwear
Long underwear is long johns.
being an amount of time that is more than average or usual, or being of a particular amount of time: The days are longer in summer than in winter. We had to wait a long time to see the doctor. We went away for a long weekend in April (= Saturday, Sunday, and an extra day or days).
Something that is long-lost has not been seen for many years before appearing suddenly: A long-lost diary was discovered among his papers.

longverb [I]

us   /lɔŋ/
  • long verb [I] (WANT)

to want something very much: [+ to infinitive] She longed to move out of the city.
(Definition of long from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"long" in Business English

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longadjective

uk   /lɒŋ/ us  
FINANCE, STOCK MARKET used to describe the situation in which you buy and keep shares, etc. because you expect them to rise in value and make a profit: Nobody wants to be long on stocks over a weekend of economic uncertainty, because stocks may fall sharply in value when markets reopen on Monday.
do/have/work long hours/days
WORKPLACE to work more hours each day than people usually do: In spite of the New Deal, junior doctors are still working dangerously long hours.

longadverb

uk   /lɒŋ/ us   FINANCE, STOCK MARKET
go long (on sth)
FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to buy or keep shares, etc. because you expect their price to rise, so that you can make a profit: The prospects for domestic demand growth in the eurozone are not great, so why not go long on sterling, where the prospects for domestic demand growth are still looking optimistic?
(Definition of long from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“long” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
by ,
May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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