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Meaning of “look” in the English Dictionary

"look" in British English

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lookverb

uk   /lʊk/ us   /lʊk/
  • look verb (SEE)

A1 [I] to direct your eyes in order to see: Look! There's grandma. They looked at the picture and laughed. Look at all these toys on the floor. She looked up from her book and smiled at me. I looked out (of) the window. Look over there - there's a rainbow!

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  • look verb (SEARCH)

A1 [I] to try to find something or someone: I'm looking for my keys. I looked everywhere, but I couldn't find my glasses. Have you looked in the dictionary? I looked down the list but couldn't see his name.

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  • look verb (SEEM)

A2 [L, I usually + adv/prep] to appear or seem: You look well! The roads look very icy. That dress looks nice on you. He has started to look his age (= appear as old as he really is). It's looking good (= things are going well). He looked (like) a friendly sort of person. The twins look just like their mother. She looked as if/though she hadn't slept all night. It looks like rain (= as if it is going to rain).

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  • look verb (DIRECTION)

B2 [I usually + adv/prep] to face a particular direction: The garden looks south. This window looks out onto the lake.

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looknoun

uk   /lʊk/ us   /lʊk/
  • look noun (WITH EYES)

B1 [C] the act of looking at someone or something: She gave him a look of real dislike. Take a (good) look at this picture and see if you recognize anyone. Can I have a look at your dictionary?

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  • look noun (SEARCH)

B1 [C usually singular] the act of trying to find someone or something: I had another look for the watch, but couldn't find it.

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  • I had a look for the book.
  • Have a good look in the cupboard.
  • You've got nits? Let's have a look.
  • I can have a look for the papers for you.
  • We'll need to have a good look round before we leave.
  • look noun (APPEARANCE)

B2 [C] an expression on someone's face: She had a worried look about her. She gave me a questioning look.
C1 [C] a style or fashion: The look this year will be relaxed and casual.
the look of sb/sth
B2 the appearance of someone or something: They liked the look of the hotel, but it was too expensive. I don't like the look of that fence (= it appears to have something wrong with it).
sb's looks
C2 a person's appearance, especially how attractive they are: I like her looks. Her looks improved as she grew older. He put on weight and started to lose his looks.

lookexclamation

uk   /lʊk/ us   /lʊk/
(Definition of look from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"look" in American English

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lookverb

us   /lʊk/
  • look verb (SEE)

[I] to direct your eyes in order to see: Come look at what I’ve found. She looked at her brother. He looked out (of) the window of the bus.
  • look verb (SEARCH)

[I always + adv/prep] to try to find something: Please help me look for my keys. We looked everywhere but couldn’t find it. I’ll look for a present for Tracy while I’m at the mall.
  • look verb (SEEM)

[L] to seem or appear to be: The roads look icy. That dress looks nice on you. He looked friendly. She looked like she hadn’t slept all night. He has started to look his age (= appear as old as he really is). It looks like (= It is likely that) we’ll be finished by January. It looks like snow (= It seems likely to snow).
  • look verb (EXAMINE)

[I always + adv/prep] to examine or study, often quickly or informally: Would you look over these numbers to see if I’ve made a mistake? I don’t go there to shop – I just like to look around and see what they have.
  • look verb (FACE)

[I] to be in or view a particular direction; face: The garden looks east. The porch looks out over the lake.

lookexclamation

us   /lʊk/
  • look exclamation (GETTING ATTENTION)

used to get someone’s attention, often to express anger or annoyance: Look, I’ve already told you that I’m not lending you any more money.

looknoun

us   /lʊk/
  • look noun (SEEM)

[C] an expression of the face, or a particular appearance: a joyful/sad look I didn’t like the look of the place and left as soon as I could. [pl] He had good looks and lots of money.
(Definition of look from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"look" in Business English

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lookverb [I]

uk   /lʊk/ us  
be looking to do sth
to plan to do something: Many Hong Kong manufacturers are looking to expand in the UK market.
I'm just looking
said to a person working in a store when they offer to help you, but you want to continue looking at the products: 'Do you need any help?' 'I'm just looking, thank you.'
look good
if something such as business, news, or a plan looks good, you think that it will succeed or that something good might happen: Margins are improving and the underlying business looks good. Strategically the deal looks good.
never look back
to continue to be successful after having an earlier success: He says: 'I applied, got the job, and have never looked back.'
(Definition of look from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“look” in Business English

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