loss Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “loss” in the English Dictionary

"loss" in British English

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lossnoun

uk   /lɒs/  us   /lɑːs/
B2 [C or U] the ​fact that you no ​longer have something or have less of something: Many ​parentsfeel a ​sense of loss when ​theirchildrenleavehome. He ​suffered a ​gradual loss of ​memory. There will be ​substantial job losses if the ​factorycloses down. blood/​hair/​weight lossC2 [S] a ​disadvantagecaused by someone ​leaving or by something being taken away: It would be a ​great loss to the ​department if you ​left.B2 [C or U] the ​death of a ​person: They never got over the loss of ​theirson.C1 [C] a ​situation in which a ​businessspends more ​money than it ​earns: The ​companyannounced a pre-tax loss of three million ​dollars.loss of life an ​occasion when a ​number of ​peopledie: The ​planecrashed with ​serious loss of ​life.

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(Definition of loss from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"loss" in American English

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lossnoun [C/U]

 us   /lɔs/
  • loss noun [C/U] (NOT HAVING)

the ​action or ​state of not having or ​keeping something any more: [C] The company’s losses over the last few ​years have been ​staggering. Loss may ​meandeath: [U] They never got over the loss of ​theirson.
  • loss noun [C/U] (NOT CONTROLLING)

the ​action or ​state of not ​maintaining or having ​control over something any more: [C] He ​suffered a ​gradual loss of ​memory in his ​lateryears.
Idioms
(Definition of loss from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"loss" in Business English

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lossnoun

uk   us   /lɒs/
[C or U] a ​situation in which you no ​longer have something or have less of something, or the ​process that causes this: The loss of ​jobs in the ​conveniencefoodindustry seems inevitable.loss of earnings/income/pay She received ​compensation for loss of ​earnings through the illness.a loss in sth The new road will cause losses in ​economicvalue to many ​localproperties.
[C] FINANCE, COMMERCE a ​situation in which a ​business or an ​organizationspends more ​money than it ​earns, or ​losesmoney in another way: announce/post/report a loss (of sth) The ​company announced a loss of €1.3m last ​year. a loss in ​revenue big/​financial/​heavy losses a net/​operating loss a pre-tax/after-tax lossincur/make/realize a loss In a ​bid to ​attractcustomers, some ​insurers may ​even be making a loss on ​contractsmarketed to ​certainkeybuyers. a loss on an ​investment/a ​sale
[C] STOCK MARKET a ​situation in which the ​value of ​shares goes down: a loss in sth Gains in ​oil and ​gas were partly ​offset by losses in ​consumerproducts and precious metals.
[U] INSURANCE a ​situation in which ​property is ​damaged, ​lost, or ​stolen, and an ​insurancecompany must ​pay to ​replace it: We will ​cover your ​housecontents against accidental loss or ​damage during the ​removal.
[C] a disadvantage caused by someone ​leaving an ​organization: be a loss to sb/sth It would be a great loss to the ​department if you ​left.
loss of face a ​situation in which someone ​loses the ​respect of other ​people because of something they have done: His first ​deal with the ​company had ​turned into a very ​public loss of face.
See also
(Definition of loss from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of loss?
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“loss” in American English

“loss” in Business English

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