low Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “low” in the English Dictionary

"low" in British English

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lowadjective

uk   /ləʊ/  us   /loʊ/

low adjective (NOT HIGH)

B1 not ​measuring much from the ​base to the ​top: a low ​fenceB1 close to the ​ground or the ​bottom of something: a low ​ceiling When we went ​skiing, I only went on the lower ​slopes.
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low adjective (LEVEL)

A2 below the ​usuallevel: Temperatures are very low for the ​time of ​year. The ​bigsupermarketoffers the lowest ​prices in ​town. These ​people are ​living on ​relatively low ​incomes. There is a ​tremendous need for more low-​costhousing. a low-​fatdiet low-​alcoholbeer Vegetables are ​generally low in (= do not ​contain many)calories.A2 producing only a ​smallamount of ​sound, ​heat, or ​light: They ​spoke in low ​voices so I would not ​hear what they were saying. Turn the ​oven to a low ​heat. Soft ​music was ​playing and the ​lights were low.B2 of ​badquality, ​especially when referring to something that is not as good as it should be: low ​standards I have a very low ​opinion of him. She has very low ​self-esteem.
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low adjective (NOT IMPORTANT)

C1 not ​consideredimportant because of being at or near the ​bottom of a ​range of things, ​especiallyjobs or ​socialpositions: low ​statusjobs a low ​prioritytask

low adjective (NOT HONEST)

not ​honest or ​fair: How low can you get? That was a ​pretty low ​trick to ​play.

low adjective (SOUND)

B2 (of a ​sound or ​voice) near or at the ​bottom of the ​range of ​sounds: He has a very low ​voice. Those low ​notes are ​played by the ​doublebass.

low adjective (SAD)

C1 unhappy: Illness of any ​sort can ​leave you ​feeling low. He ​seemed in low ​spirits.

lowadverb

uk   /ləʊ/  us   /loʊ/

low adverb (NOT HIGH)

B1 close to the ​ground or the ​bottom of something: The ​planesfly low ​acrossenemyterritory.

low adverb (LEVEL)

B1 at or to a low ​level: low-paid ​workers Turn the ​oven on low.be/get/run low (on sth) to have ​nearlyfinished a ​supply of something: We're ​running low on ​milk - could you ​buy some more? The ​radiobatteries are ​running low.

lowverb [I]

uk   /ləʊ/  us   /loʊ/ literary
to make the ​deep, ​longsound of a ​cow

lownoun

uk   /ləʊ/  us   /loʊ/
a ​badtime in someone's ​life: the highs and lows of an ​actingcareera new/record/all-time low the lowest ​level: The ​dollar has ​hit an ​all-time low against the ​Japaneseyen.
(Definition of low from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"low" in American English

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lowadjective, adverb [-er/-est only]

 us   /loʊ/

low adjective, adverb [-er/-est only] (NOT HIGH)

not high or ​tall; ​close to the ​ground, or near the ​bottom of something: a low ​fence/​ceiling Until I’m a ​betterskier, I’ll ​stay on the lower ​slopes. That ​plane is ​flyingawfully low.

low adjective, adverb [-er/-est only] (SMALLER THAN USUAL)

smaller than the ​usual or ​averagesize, ​number, ​value, or ​amount: They have the lowest ​foodprices in ​town. Temperatures will ​dip lower near the end of the ​week. Believe it or not, this ​dessert is low in ​calories. If a ​supply of something ​becomes low, you have very little of it ​left: We’re ​running low on ​gas. Low can also ​meanproducing only a ​smallamount of ​sound, ​heat, or ​light: They ​spoke in low ​voices. She ​turned the ​heat down low. Low can also ​mean of ​badquality: My ​testresults were disappointingly low.

lowadjective

 us   /loʊ/

low adjective (NOT IMPORTANT)

[-er/-est only] not ​important, or not of high ​rank: low ​socialstatus

low adjective (SOUND)

(of a ​sound or ​voice) near or at the ​bottom of the ​range of ​sounds: a low ​voice/​notelow-pitched If a ​sound is low-pitched, it is at the ​bottom of the ​range of ​sounds: He gave a low-pitched ​whistle and his ​dog came ​running.

low adjective (NOT KIND)

(of ​behavior or ​speech) ​mean or ​unfair: What a ​cruelcomment – how low can you get?

low adjective (UNHAPPY)

[-er/-est only] unhappy or ​discouraged: She’s ​feelingpretty low because she ​failed her driver’s ​test.

lownoun [C]

 us   /loʊ/

low noun [C] (SMALLER THAN USUAL)

a ​smaller than ​usualamount or ​level, or the ​smallestamount or ​level: Enrollment at the ​collegereached new lows this ​fall. The ​temperature in Boston ​reached a ​record low last ​night.
(Definition of low from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"low" in Business English

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lowadjective

uk   us   /ləʊ/
below the usual or expected ​level or ​amount: The ​offer was ​rejected on the ​grounds that it was too low.low inflation/interest rates/taxes The ​housingboom coincided with a ​flateconomy, low ​inflation, and a ​fallingstockmarket. Interest ​ratesfell to their lowest ​level since ​records began in January 1975.low prices/costs/fees Higher ​profits and lower ​pricesliftdemand and ​keepinflation in ​check. The ​manufacturingindustry has been ​hit by low ​productivity, ​fallingsales and ​mountinglosses. Developers are ​focusing on ​building more ​affordablehousingtargeted at families on low ​incomes. These ​dedicatedstaff put up with ​longhours and low ​pay, because they love the ​job.low unemployment/crime Unemployment in the ​region is lower than the ​nationalaverage.
not very good or acceptable: low quality/standards Attempts at ​voluntaryregulation had ​failed because too many ​companies with low ​standards had not ​joined the ​system.
not important because of being at the ​bottom of a ​range or ​group of things: Transport was a low ​priority for the new ​administration. More ​flexibleworkingconditions are ​changing the traditionally low ​status of ​part-timejobs.
be/get/run low (on sth) to have very little of something ​left: Gas ​stations were running low on ​suppliesdue to the ​blockade. This ​symbolmeans the ​printerink is getting low.

lowadverb

uk   us   /ləʊ/
at a ​level which is less than usual or expected: Working from ​home and communicating ​online helped them keepcosts low while they were setting up their new ​business.
at or to a ​position of less ​importance: Ethics ​training ranks low on the manager's ​prioritylist.

lownoun [C]

uk   us   /ləʊ/
the lowest ​level that something has ​reached since it has been ​measured or during a particular ​period: hit/fall to a low The company's ​stockfell to a six-month low.a new/record/all-time low The ​dollarhit a ​record low against the ​euro and was down ​sharply against the Japanese ​yen. The ​price of ​oil has nearly ​doubled from last year's lows.
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(Definition of low from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“low” in Business English

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