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Meaning of “magic” in the English Dictionary

"magic" in British English

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magicnoun [U]

uk   /ˈmædʒ.ɪk/ us   /ˈmædʒ.ɪk/
  • magic noun [U] (SPECIAL POWER)

A2 the use of special powers to make things happen that would usually be impossible, such as in stories for children: The group is known for its belief in witchcraft and magic. As if by magic/Like magic, the car changes into a boat when it hits the water.
A2 the skill of performing tricks to entertain people, such as making things appear and disappear and pretending to cut someone in half: He's a comedian who also does magic.

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magicadjective

uk   /ˈmædʒ.ɪk/ us   /ˈmædʒ.ɪk/
A2 with special powers: The witch put a magic spell on the prince and turned him into a frog. I'll show you a magic trick.
B1 happening in an unusual or unexpected way, or easily or quickly: There's no magic solution to the problem. There's no magic formula for winning - just lots of hard work.

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magicexclamation

uk   /ˈmædʒ.ɪk/ us   /ˈmædʒ.ɪk/ UK old-fashioned informal
(Definition of magic from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"magic" in American English

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magicnoun [U]

us   /ˈmædʒ·ɪk/
  • magic noun [U] (IMAGINARY POWER)

(esp. in stories for children) the use of special powers to make things happen that would usually be impossible: a tale of witchcraft and magic
Magic is also the skill of performing tricks to entertain people, such as making things seem to appear and disappear, or the tricks performed: My daughter loves doing magic.
  • magic noun [U] (SPECIAL QUALITY)

a special, exciting quality that makes something or someone different and better than others: As an actress, she has lost none of her magic, and she still is thrilling to watch.
(Definition of magic from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“magic” in American English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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