manage Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “manage” in the English Dictionary

"manage" in British English

See all translations

manageverb

uk   us   /ˈmæn.ɪdʒ/
  • manage verb (SUCCEED)

B1 [I or T] to ​succeed in doing or ​dealing with something, ​especially something ​difficult: [+ to infinitive] Did you manage to get any ​bread? I only just managed tofinish on ​time. A ​smalldog had somehow managed tosurvive the ​fire. I can't manage all this ​work on my own. Don't ​worry about us - we'll manage!mainly UK I'm ​afraid I can't manage the ​time (= to ​find enough ​time) to ​see you at the ​moment. [I] to ​succeed in ​living on a ​smallamount of ​money: After she ​lost her ​job, they had to manage on his ​salary. [T] to be ​able to ​attend or do something at a ​particulartime: Let's ​meettomorrow - I can manage 3.UK Can you manage ​dinner on ​Saturday? Can't you manage any ​earlier?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • manage verb (CONTROL)

B1 [T] to be ​responsible for ​controlling or ​organizing someone or something, ​especially a ​business or ​employees: Has she had any ​experience of managing ​largeprojects? He's not very good at managing ​people. His ​jobinvolved managing ​largeinvestmentfunds. When you have a ​job as well as ​children to ​look after, you have to ​learn how to manage ​yourtime.
See also

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of manage from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"manage" in American English

See all translations

manageverb

 us   /ˈmæn·ɪdʒ/
  • manage verb (SUCCEED)

[I/T] to ​succeed in doing something, esp. something ​difficult: [+ to infinitive] The ​pilot managed to ​land the ​planesafely. [+ to infinitive] We managed to ​live on very little ​money. [I] Don’t ​worry about us – we’ll manage.
  • manage verb (CONTROL)

[T] to ​control or ​organize someone or something, esp. a ​business: Does she have any ​experience managing ​largeprojects?
(Definition of manage from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"manage" in Business English

See all translations

manageverb

uk   us   /ˈmænɪdʒ/
[I or T] MANAGEMENT, HR, WORKPLACE to be in ​charge of and ​control a ​company, ​department, ​project, ​team, etc. : Managing a large ​corporation has become more complex and ​challenging. What ​kind of ​skills and ​qualities do ​people need to manage? Early ​biotechcompanies typically were ​founded, ​staffed and managed by scientists. He's not very good at managing ​people.
[I or T] to be able to use something, for ​exampletime or ​money, in an ​effective way: Young ​people often need ​help in managing their ​finances. Can you give me some ​advice on how to manage my ​time better?
[T] FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to be ​responsible for ​investingmoney for ​investors: She ​works for a Boston-based private-equity ​firm that manages about $2 ​billion in ​energyindustryinvestments. All our ​funds are managed by ​expertinvestmentadvisors.
(Definition of manage from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of manage?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“manage” in British English

“manage” in American English

“manage” in Business English

Word of the Day

fire-eater

a performer who entertains people by seeming to swallow flames

Word of the Day

I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
I used to work hard/I’m used to working hard (Phrases with ‘used to’)
by Kate Woodford,
February 10, 2016
On this blog, we like to look at words and phrases in the English language that learners often have difficulty with. Two phrases that can be confused are ‘used to do something’ and ‘be used to something/doing something’. People often use one phrase when they mean the other, or they use the wrong

Read More 

farecasting noun
farecasting noun
February 08, 2016
predicting the optimum date to buy a plane ticket, especially on a website or using an app A handful of new and updated websites and apps are trying to perfect the art of what’s known as farecasting – predicting the best date to buy a ticket.

Read More