marshal Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “marshal” in the English Dictionary

"marshal" in British English

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marshalverb [T]

uk   /ˈmɑː.ʃəl/  us   /ˈmɑːr.ʃəl/ (-ll- or US usually -l-)

marshalnoun [C]

uk   /ˈmɑː.ʃəl/  us   /ˈmɑːr.ʃəl/
  • marshal noun [C] (LAW)

US a government official who is responsible for putting the decisions of a law court into action: US marshals specialize in finding fugitives and escapees.
  • marshal noun [C] (OFFICER)

(also Marshal) a title used for important officers in the armed forces of some countries: a field marshal/air vice marshal Marshal Pétain [as form of address] Yes, Marshal.
(also Marshal) a title used for police or fire officers in some parts of the US: The deputy state fire marshal led the arson investigation. [as form of address] Thank you, Marshal.
(Definition of marshal from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"marshal" in American English

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marshalverb [T]

 us   /ˈmɑr·ʃəl/
  • marshal verb [T] (ORGANIZE)

to gather or organize people or things, esp. in order to achieve a particular aim: The president is trying to marshal support for his plan.

marshalnoun [C]

 us   /ˈmɑr·ʃəl/
  • marshal noun [C] (OFFICIAL)

an official who arranges and controls a public ceremony: The mayor was the honorary grand marshal of the St. Patrick’s Day parade.
  • marshal noun [C] (LAW)

a government official who is responsible for putting the decisions of a law court into effect: He was conducted to the airport by federal marshals and deported.
In some parts of the US, marshal is also a title used for police or fire department officers of high rank.
(Definition of marshal from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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