mass Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “mass” in the English Dictionary

"mass" in British English

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massadjective [before noun]

uk   /mæs/  us   /mæs/
C1 having an effect on or involving a large number of people or forming a large amount: weapons of mass destruction a mass murderer mass starvation Opposition groups plan to stage mass demonstrations all over the country.

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massnoun

uk   /mæs/  us   /mæs/
  • mass noun (LARGE AMOUNT)

B2 [S] a large amount of something that has no particular shape or arrangement: The explosion reduced the church to a mass of rubble. The forest is a mass of colour in autumn.
masses [plural] UK informal
B2 a lot: [+ to infinitive] I've got masses to do at the weekend. There were masses of people in town today.
the mass of sth
most of something: The mass of the people support the reforms.

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  • mass noun (PHYSICS)

[C] specialized physics the amount of matter in any solid object or in any volume of liquid or gas: The acceleration of a body equals the force exerted on it divided by its mass.
mass number
the total number of protons and neutrons in an atom
mass defect
the difference between the mass of a nucleus (= central part of an atom) and the mass of the separate pieces that make up the nucleus

massverb [I]

uk   /mæs/  us   /mæs/
(Definition of mass from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"mass" in American English

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massnoun [C]

 us   /mæs/
  • mass noun [C] (LARGE AMOUNT)

a large amount or number: A mass of earth and granite slid down into the narrow gorge. We had to wade through masses of seaweed.
  • mass noun [C] (MATTER)

[C] physics the amount of matter in any solid object or in any volume of liquid or gas
mass number physics
The mass number is the total number of protons and neutrons in an atom.
mass defect physics
The mass defect is the difference between the mass of a nucleus (= central part of an atom) and the mass of the separate pieces that make up the nucleus.
  • mass noun [C] (ART)

art [U] the outside size or shape of an object, or how big it appears to be

massverb [I/T]

 us   /mæs/
  • mass verb [I/T] (CREATE LARGE AMOUNT)

to come or bring together in large numbers: [I] The crowd massed around the entrance to the exhibition.

massadjective [not gradable]

 us   /mæs/
involving or having an effect on a large number of people or things: weapons of mass destruction They hope the new movie will appeal to a mass audience.

Massnoun [C/U]

 us   /mæs/
(esp. in the Roman Catholic Church) a religious ceremony based on Jesus’s last meal with his disciples (= the men who followed him), or music written for the parts of this ceremony
(Definition of mass from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"mass" in Business English

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massadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /mæs/
having an effect on or involving a large number of people: There have been two decades of mass unemployment. mass audience/appeal A smaller company could produce a breakthrough product with mass appeal.mass consumerism/consumption The society that we live in now is so geared to spending and mass consumerism. a mass protest/rally/action
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massnoun

uk   us   /mæs/
[U] the amount of matter in any solid object or volume of liquid or gas: These activities help strengthen bones and increase their mass.
a mass of sth [S]
a large amount of something: The media company has enjoyed a mass of hype. They were part of the large mass of consumers who acquired a credit card in the 1980s.
(Definition of mass from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“mass” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
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by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

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