message Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “message” in the English Dictionary

"message" in British English

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messagenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈmes.ɪdʒ/
  • message noun [C] (INFORMATION)

A1 a ​shortpiece of ​information that you give to a ​person when you cannot ​speak to them ​directly: If I'm not there when you ​call, leave a message. [+ that] I got a message that she'll be late.

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  • message noun [C] (IDEA)

B2 the most ​importantidea in a ​book, ​film, or ​play, or an ​idea that you ​want to ​tellpeople about: The movie's message is that ​rich and ​poor are ​alike. We need to send a ​clear message that ​pollution will not be ​tolerated.get the message informal to ​understand what someone is ​trying to ​tell you, ​even if that ​person is not ​expressing himself or herself ​directly: I never ​answer his ​calls, so you'd ​think he'd get the message.get the message across to make someone ​understand: We need to get the message ​across that too much ​sun is ​dangerous.

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messageverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈmes.ɪdʒ/
to ​send someone a ​short message using a ​mobilephone or ​computer: I messaged him ​yesterday but haven't had a ​reply.
messaging
noun [U] /ˈmes.ɪ.dʒɪŋ/
Instant messaging ​alertsusers when ​theirfriends are ​online.
(Definition of message from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"message" in American English

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messagenoun [C]

 us   /ˈmes·ɪdʒ/
  • message noun [C] (INFORMATION)

a ​shortpiece of written or ​spokeninformation that is given or ​sent to someone: If I’m not there when you ​phone, ​leave a message. She’s not here – can I take a message?
  • message noun [C] (IDEA)

the ​mainidea that an ​artist, ​writer, ​speaker, or ​group is ​trying to ​communicate: The message of the ​movieseems to be that only the most ​ruthlesspeople can get ​ahead in ​politics.
(Definition of message from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"message" in Business English

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messagenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈmesɪdʒ/
COMMUNICATIONS a ​shortpiece of ​information that you give or ​send to a ​person when you cannot speak to them directly: message from sb for sb There was a message for you from the ​cateringcompany.message that I got your message that the ​meeting was ​postponed. leave a message If I'm not there when you ​phone, ​leave a message on my ​voicemail.take a message She's not here now; can I take a message?send sb a message He ​sent me several messages about the problem. I had a message in my ​inbox.
IT a ​piece of ​information that appears on a ​computerscreen: I ​kept getting a message saying "Disable ​cookies".
MARKETING the ​mainidea in an ​advertisement, speech, etc., or something that you want to tell ​people: The ad's main message should be that our ​products are ​safe to use.send a message Ridding the ​organization of ​poorperformers also ​sends a ​strong message of ​low tolerance for ​poorresults.
US an ​advertisement on ​television or radio: We'll be back ​right after these messages.

messageverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈmesɪdʒ/
COMMUNICATIONS to ​send someone a message using ​electronicequipment: Not many ​people use the ​facility of viewing ​streamingvideo of the ​person they are messaging.
(Definition of message from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“message” in American English

“message” in Business English

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