Meaning of “might” in the English Dictionary

"might" in English

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mightmodal verb

uk /maɪt/ us /maɪt/

might modal verb (MAY)

past simple of the verb may, used especially when reporting what someone has said, thought, asked, etc.:

I brought him some sandwiches because I thought he might be hungry.
Very politely the little boy asked if he might have another piece of cake (= he said "May I have another piece of cake, please?").

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might modal verb (POSSIBILITY)

A2 used to express the possibility that something will happen or be done, or that something is true although not very likely:

I might come and visit you next year, if I can save enough money.
Don't go any closer - it might be dangerous/it might not be safe.
Driving so fast, he might have had a nasty accident (= it could have happened but it did not).
The rain might have stopped by now.

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might modal verb (PERMISSION)

mainly UK formal US old-fashioned used as a more polite form of may when asking for permission:

Might I ask a question?
I wonder if I might have a quick look at your newspaper?

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might modal verb (INTRODUCE)

also may used to introduce a statement that is very different from the statement you really want to make, in order to compare the two:

The amount you save might be small, but it's still worth doing.

mightnoun [ U ]

uk /maɪt/ us /maɪt/

(Definition of “might” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"might" in American English

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might

us /mɑɪt/

might (MAY)

past simple of may

mightmodal verb

us /mɑɪt/ present tense might

might modal verb (POSSIBILITY)

used to express the possibility that something will happen or be done or is true, although it may not be very likely:

We might come visit you in Atlanta in the spring.
He’s very fast and he might even finish in the top three.
The Beach Boys might well have been the most talented act to perform at the Monterey Pop Festival.

might modal verb (SUGGESTION)

used to make a suggestion or suggest a possibility in a polite way:

I thought you might like to join me for dinner.

might modal verb (SHOULD)

used to suggest, esp. angrily, what someone should do to be pleasant or polite:

You might at least try to look like you’re enjoying yourself!

mightnoun [ U ]

us /mɑɪt/

might noun [ U ] (POWER)

power, strength, or force:

She struggled with all her might to lift the rock.

(Definition of “might” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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might

At the end of the day, we rely on goodwill and, if that is not there, we might as well forget it.
Therefore, limiting this directive to racial and ethnic discrimination risks leaving the door open to ambiguities in interpretation with which the courts might struggle to deal.
The meeting will consider how a comprehensive approach at national and international level might tackle these three diseases and how we can make a difference.
We might say that sport has got there first, that sport built structures before we were able to do so at political, economic or other levels.
One might well wonder why.
We might well hope that, before the whole of this package is in place, there will be very many more of us, as citizens, who are affected by these rules.
You might not like it that they believe the scriptures, you might not like what the scriptures say, but they have a right to hold those views.
Four revisions in fifteen years have not improved matters, and now we are expected to believe that a charter or a constitution might do something to change things.
In order to win back their confidence, extremely drastic measures are taken, the necessity of which in terms of safety might be questioned.
I just have certain worries about the automatic stays and suspect that we might need some fine-tuning at a later stage.