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Meaning of “millennium” in the English Dictionary

"millennium" in British English

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millenniumnoun [C]

uk   /mɪˈlen.i.əm/  us   /mɪˈlen.i.əm/ (plural millennia or millenniums)
C2 a ​period of 1,000 ​years, or the ​time when a ​period of 1,000 ​yearsends: The ​corpse had ​lainpreserved in the ​soil for ​almost two millennia.
Compare
the millennium
the ​beginning of a new millennium in the ​year 2000: How did you ​celebrate the millennium?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • The ​book is a ​history of the last two millennia.
  • Imagine what the ​world will be like at the end of the next millennium.
(Definition of millennium from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"millennium" in American English

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millenniumnoun [C]

 us   /məˈlen·i·əm/ (plural millennia  /məˈlen·i·ə/ or millenniums)
a ​period of 1000 ​years: The ​area has ​experienced the ​worstdrought in ​half a millennium.
millennial
adjective [not gradable]  us   /məˈlen·i·əl/
(Definition of millennium from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “millennium”
in Korean 천년간…
in Arabic ألفيّة…
in Malaysian millenium…
in French millénaire…
in Russian тысячелетие…
in Chinese (Traditional) 一千年,千周年, 千周年紀念日…
in Italian millennio…
in Turkish binyıl, binyıllık dönem…
in Polish tysiąclecie, millenium…
in Spanish milenio…
in Vietnamese thiên niên kỷ…
in Portuguese milênio…
in Thai ระยะเวลาหนึ่งพันปี…
in German das Jahrtausend…
in Catalan mil·leni…
in Japanese 1000年間…
in Chinese (Simplified) 一千年,千周年, 千周年纪念日…
in Indonesian seribu tahun…
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“millennium” in American English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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