mother Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “mother” in the English Dictionary

"mother" in British English

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mothernoun [C]

uk   /ˈmʌð.ər/  us   //

mother noun [C] (PARENT)

A1 a ​femaleparent: My mother was 21 when she got ​married. All the mothers and ​fathers had been ​invited to the end-of-term ​concert. The little ​kittens and ​their mother were all ​curled up ​asleep in the same ​basket. [as form of address] formal or old-fashioned May I ​borrowyourcar, Mother?
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mother noun [C] (RELIGIOUS WOMAN)

(also Mother) the ​title of a woman who is in ​charge of, or who has a high ​rank within, a convent (= ​house of ​religious women): Mother Theresa a mother superior [as form of address] Good ​morning, Mother.

mother noun [C] (SLANG)

very offensive mainly US →  motherfucker

motherverb [T]

uk   /ˈmʌð.ər/  us   // often disapproving
to ​treat a ​person with ​greatkindness and ​love and to ​try to ​protect them from anything ​dangerous or ​difficult: Stop mothering her - she's 40 ​yearsold and can take ​care of herself.
(Definition of mother from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"mother" in American English

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 us   /ˈmʌð·ər/

mother noun (PARENT)

[C] a ​femaleparent: My mother was 20 when I was ​born. Mother, where’s my ​redblouse?

mother noun (EXTREME THING)

[U] the ​largest or most ​extremeexample of something: They got ​caught in a mother of a ​storm.

motherverb [T]

 us   /ˈmʌð·ər/

mother verb [T] (PARENT)

to ​treat someone with ​kindness and ​affection and ​try to ​protect that ​person from ​danger or ​difficulty: Leave me ​alone – I don’t need to be mothered.
(Definition of mother from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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