mount Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “mount” in the English Dictionary

"mount" in British English

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mountverb

uk   us   /maʊnt/

mount verb (INCREASE)

C2 [I] to ​graduallyincrease, ​rise, or get ​bigger: The children's ​excitement is mounting as ​Christmas gets ​nearer.
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mount verb (GET ON)

C2 [I or T] to get on a ​horse, ​bicycle, etc.. in ​order to ​ride: She mounted her ​horse and ​rode off.

mount verb (GO UP)

[T] to go up or onto: He mounted the ​platform and ​began to ​speak to the ​assembledcrowd.formal Queen Elizabeth II mounted the ​throne (= ​becamequeen) in 1952.

mount verb (ORGANIZE)

C2 [T] to ​organize and ​begin an ​activity or ​event: to mount an ​attack/​campaign/​challenge/​protest to mount an ​exhibition/​display

mount verb (FIX)

C2 [T] to ​fix something to a ​wall, in a ​frame, etc., so that it can be ​looked at or used: The children's ​work has been mounted oncolouredpaper and put up on the ​walls of the ​classroom. The ​surveillancecamera is mounted above the ​maindoor.

mount verb (GUARD)

[T] to ​place someone on ​guard: Sentries are mounted ​outside the ​palace at all ​times.mount guard (on/over sb) to ​guard someone: Armed ​securityofficers are ​employed to mount ​guard over the ​president.
Phrasal verbs

mountnoun [C]

uk   us   /maʊnt/

mount noun [C] (HORSE)

formal a ​horse: an ​excellent mount for a ​child

mount noun [C] (FOR A PICTURE, ETC.)

something, such as a ​piece of ​card, that you put something on to show it: A ​black mount for this ​picture would ​look good.

Mountnoun

uk   us   /maʊnt/ (written abbreviation Mt)
used as ​part of the ​name of a ​mountain: Mount Everest Mount Hood
(Definition of mount from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"mount" in American English

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mountverb

 us   /mɑʊnt/

mount verb (GET ONTO)

[I/T] to get onto something: [T] The ​winners mounted the ​podium. [I] When the ​horses were ​saddled we mounted up and ​rode away.

mount verb (GO UP)

[T] to go up something: Reaching the ​porch, he mounted the ​steps.

mount verb (INCREASE)

[I] to ​increase, ​rise, or get ​bigger: Excitement mounted as the racers neared the ​finish. Watch what you ​eat, because those ​calories really mount up.

mount verb (ORGANIZE)

[T] to ​prepare and ​produce; to ​organize: He has the ​supportneeded to mount a ​successfulcampaign.

mount verb (ATTACH)

[T] to ​attach something to something ​else so that it can be ​seen: Don’s ​planning to mount these ​photographs.

Mountnoun [U]

 us   /mɑʊnt/ (abbreviation Mt.)
(used esp. as ​part of the ​name of a ​place) a high ​hill or ​mountain: Mount Saint Helens Mt. Fuji
(Definition of mount from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"mount" in Business English

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mountverb [I]

uk   us   /maʊnt/
to gradually ​increase, ​rise, or get bigger: The ​pressure is mounting on the ​policymakers to ​reach a decision.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of mount from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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