movement Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “movement” in the English Dictionary

"movement" in British English

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uk   us   /ˈmuːv.mənt/

movement noun (POSITION CHANGE)

B2 [C or U] a ​change of ​position: He made a ​sudden movement and ​frightened the ​bird away. For a ​longtime after the ​accident, he had no movement in (= was ​unable to ​move) his ​legs. Her movements were ​'s movements what someone is doing during a ​particularperiod: I don't ​know his movements this ​week.
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movement noun (GROUP OF PEOPLE)

C1 [C, + sing/pl verb] a ​group of ​people with a ​particular set of ​aims: the women's movement The ​suffragette movement ​campaigned for ​votes for women. [+ to infinitive] a movement tostopanimals being ​killed for ​theirfur

movement noun (CHANGE OPINION)

[C or U] a ​situation in which ​peoplechangetheiropinion or the way that they ​live or ​work: There has been a movement towards more women going back to ​work while ​theirchildren are still ​young. Recently there has been some movement away fromtraditionalmethods of ​teaching.

movement noun (PROGRESS)

[U] an ​occasion when something ​develops, ​changes, or ​happens in a ​particular way or ​direction: There has been little movement in the ​dollar (= it has not ​changed in ​value very much) today.

movement noun (MUSIC)

[C] one of the ​mainparts of a ​piece of classicalmusic: Beethoven's fifth ​symphony has four movements.

movement noun (CLOCK/WATCH)

[C] the ​part of a ​clock or ​watch that ​turns the hands (= ​thinsticks) that ​point to the ​time

movement noun (EXCRETE)

[C] polite word (used ​especially by ​doctors and ​nurses) an ​act of ​emptying the ​bowels: When did you last have a (​bowel) movement?
(Definition of movement from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"movement" in American English

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 us   /ˈmuv·mənt/

movement noun (CHANGE OF CONDITIONS)

[C/U] the ​act or ​process of ​changing a ​situation or ​event, or of ​changing the way something ​happens or is done: [C] There has been a movement toward ​smallerfamilies.

movement noun (ACTION)

[C] a ​group of ​people with a ​particular set of ​aims: The women’s movement ​works for ​betterjobopportunities for women.

movement noun (CHANGE OF POSITION)

[C/U] a ​change of ​position or ​place: [U] Fire ​doors should be ​keptclosed to ​prevent the movement of ​fire from one ​area to another.

movement noun (CHANGE OF BODY PLACE)

[C/U] a ​change in the ​place or ​position of ​yourbody or a ​part of ​yourbody: [C] the movements of the ​dancers [U] There was no movement in his ​legs.
(Definition of movement from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"movement" in Business English

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uk   us   /ˈmuːvmənt/
[C] FINANCE, STOCK MARKET a ​change in a ​number, ​price, etc. for ​example on a ​financialmarket: movements in sth Short-term movements in ​currency are difficult to ​predict. This ​stockmarketreport discusses the latest ​trends and reasons behind ​share price movements.
[C] POLITICS an ​organizedgroup of ​people who ​work together to ​achieve or ​oppose something: She's been in the environmental movement for 35 ​years. the labour/​labor/(​trade) ​union movement the civil-rights/women's movement
[C or U] TRANSPORT the ​process of ​moving or being ​transported from one ​place to another: the company's movement of ​jobs abroad We want to ​removerestrictions on ​trade and movements of ​capital. Under ​Europeanlawproductsafetytakesprecedence over freedom of movement for the ​product.
[S] the ​process of ​changing from one particular ​system, ​activity, etc. to another: a movement to/towards/from sth The movement toward ​freetrade lies at the heart of ​globalization.
(Definition of movement from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“movement” in Business English

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