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Meaning of “much” in the English Dictionary

"much" in British English

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muchdeterminer

uk   /mʌtʃ/ us   /mʌtʃ/ more, most
A1 a large amount or to a large degree: I don't earn much money. You haven't said much, Joan - what do you think? I like her very much. I don't think there's much to be gained by catching an earlier flight. The children never eat (very) much, but they seem healthy. "Is there any wine left?" "Not much." There's not/nothing much to do around here. How much (= what amount of) sugar do you take in your coffee? How much do these shoes cost? I spend too much on clothes. I don't have as much time as (= I have less time than) I would like for visiting my friends. Because of the rain, we weren't able to spend much of the day on the beach. Have you seen much of Polly (= often seen her) recently? I'd very much like to visit them sometime. One day I hope I'll be able to do as much (= the same amount) for you as you've done for me. Things around here are much as always/as usual (= have not changed a lot). The two schools are much the same (= very similar). Much to our surprise, (= we were very surprised that) they accepted our offer. I'm not much good at knitting (= do not do it very well). This is a much (= often) discussed issue. Blake has become a much (= greatly) changed person since his car accident. I've been feeling much healthier (= a lot more healthy) since I became a vegetarian. The repairs to our car cost much more than we were expecting. I'm very much aware of the problem. She's much the best person for the job (= she is certainly better than everyone else). I would much rather have my baby at home than in hospital. She is as much a friend to me as a mother (= although she is my mother, she is also a friend).
much too much
a far larger amount of something than you want or need: You've drunk much too much to drive.
too much
A2 more than someone can deal with: I can't take care of six children at my age - it's too much.
a bit much
too extreme or not reasonable: I think it's a bit much for you to expect me to do all the cleaning. She wore an expensive suit and diamonds, which was a bit much for such a casual restaurant.
UK informal humorous used at the end of a sentence to emphasize what you have just said: When he saw all the food on my plate, he said "Hungry much?"

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Grammar

muchpronoun, adverb

uk   /mʌtʃ/ us   /mʌtʃ/
Grammar
(Definition of much from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"much" in American English

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muchadjective, adverb

us   /mʌtʃ/ comparative more /mɔr, moʊr/ , superlative most /moʊst/
  • much adjective, adverb (GREAT)

great in amount, degree, or range: Mark’s got too much work to do. I don’t have much money to spend. Jody doesn’t eat very much. It doesn’t matter that much to me whether we go or not. Thank you so/very much. She doesn’t go out much (= often). He’s feeling much better/worse (= a lot better or worse). Rita would much rather have her baby at home than in a hospital (= She would greatly prefer it). Note: Much is used with singular, uncountable nouns.

muchnoun [U]

us   /mʌtʃ/
  • much noun [U] (AMOUNT)

an amount or degree of something: How much sugar do you take in your coffee? Do these shoes cost much?

muchadverb

us   /mʌtʃ/ comparative more /mɔr, moʊr/ , superlative most /moʊst/
  • much adverb (NEARLY)

nearly; approximately: The two schools are much the same. She is so much like her mother.

muchpronoun, noun [U]

us   /mʌtʃ/
  • much pronoun, noun [U] (GREAT)

a great amount, degree, or range: There’s not much to do around here. He’s still recovering, and sleeps much of the time.
(Definition of much from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“much” in British English

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