natural Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “natural” in the English Dictionary

"natural" in British English

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naturaladjective

uk   /ˈnætʃ.ər.əl/  us   /-ɚ-/

natural adjective (NOT ARTIFICIAL)

B1 as ​found in ​nature and not ​involving anything made or done by ​people: a natural ​substance People say that breast-feeding is ​better than ​bottle-feeding because it's more natural. He ​died from natural causes (= because he was ​old or ​ill). Floods and ​earthquakes are natural disasters.C1 A natural ​ability or ​characteristic is one that you were ​born with: natural ​beauty a natural ​talent for ​sports She's a natural ​blonde (= her ​realhaircolour is ​blonde). Natural ​food or ​drink is ​pure and has no ​chemicalsubstancesadded to it and is ​thereforethought to be ​healthy: natural ​mineralwater natural ​ingredientssb's natural mother/father/parent a ​parent who ​caused someone to be ​born, ​althoughpossibly not ​theirlegalparent or the ​parent who ​raised them
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natural adjective (EXPECTED)

B2 normal or ​expected: Of ​course you're ​upset - it's only natural. It's natural that you should ​feelanxious when you first ​leavehome. It's ​quite natural toexperience a few ​doubts just before you get ​married.
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natural adjective (MUSIC)

[after noun] (of a ​musicalnote) not sharp or flat: E natural

naturalnoun [C]

uk   /ˈnætʃ.ər.əl/  us   /-ɚ-/ informal
someone who was ​born with the ​rightcharacteristics or ​abilities for doing a ​particular thing: She won't have any ​troubleslearning to ​ride a ​horse - you can ​see she's a natural.
(Definition of natural from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"natural" in American English

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naturaladjective

 us   /ˈnætʃ·ər·əl/

natural adjective (NOT ARTIFICIAL)

from ​nature; not ​artificial or ​involving anything made or caused by ​people: Cotton is a natural ​fiber. He ​died of natural ​causes (= because he was ​old or ​ill). Floods and ​earthquakes are natural ​disasters. If ​food or ​drink is ​described as natural, it ​means it has no ​artificialchemicalsubstancesadded to it.

natural adjective (BORN WITH)

having an ​ability or ​characteristic because you were ​born with it: a natural ​athlete a natural ​blonde

natural adjective (EXPECTED)

to be ​expected; ​usual: a natural ​reaction [+ to infinitive] It’s only natural to be ​upset when ​yourdogdies.

natural adjective (MUSIC)

music /ˈnætʃ·ər·əl/ [not gradable] (of written ​music) having no sharp or flat : a B natural a natural ​scale

naturalnoun [C]

 us   /ˈnætʃ·ər·əl/

natural noun [C] (MUSIC)

music /ˈnætʃ·ər·əl/ a ​mark in written ​music that ​shows that a ​note should ​return to ​itsoriginal pitch

natural noun [C] (PERSON BORN WITH)

infml a ​personborn with the characteristics or ​abilitiesneeded for doing something: She won’t have any ​troublelearning to ​ride a ​horse – she’s a natural.
(Definition of natural from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"natural" in Business English

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naturaladjective

uk   us   /ˈnætʃərəl/
as ​found in nature, and not involving anything made or done by ​people: natural flavourings/foods/ingredients Over 50% of all ​cosmeticsproducts in the Chinese ​market are ​advertised as consisting of natural ​ingredients. They are ​implementing a ​majoreconomicrecoveryprogramme after the country's worst-ever natural ​disaster.
normal or expected: Having seen the ​value of their ​sharescollapse, it was only natural for ​shareholders to ​complain. For the ​customer, the natural ​choice is a ​repaymentmortgage, not an ​endowment.
used to describe an ​ability or a characteristic that someone was born with: He was a natural ​leader.
(Definition of natural from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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