navigate Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “navigate” in the English Dictionary

"navigate" in British English

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navigateverb [I or T]

uk   us   /ˈnæv.ɪ.ɡeɪt/
transport to ​direct the way that a ​ship, ​aircraft, etc. will ​travel, or to ​find a ​directionacross, along, or over an ​area of ​water or ​land, often by using a ​map: Sailors have ​specialequipment to ​help them navigate. Even ​ancientships were ​able to navigate ​largestretches of ​openwater. Some ​migratingbirds can navigate by the ​moon (= using the ​moon as a ​guide). There weren't any ​roadsigns to ​help us navigate through the ​maze of ​one-waystreets. We had to navigate several ​flights of ​stairs to ​find his ​office. internet & telecoms to ​move around a ​website or ​computerscreen, or between ​websites or ​screens: Their ​website is ​fairlyplain, but very ​easy to navigate.
(Definition of navigate from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"navigate" in American English

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navigateverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈnæv·ɪˌɡeɪt/
to ​direct the way that a ​vehicle, esp. a ​ship or ​aircraft will ​travel, or to ​find a ​directionacross, along, or over an ​area of ​water or ​land: [T] He ​learned to navigate these ​waters. [I] Whales navigate by ​visualmeans. [I] fig. Cyberspace is an ​environment in which ​computers navigate.
navigation
noun [U]  us   /ˌnæv·ɪˈɡeɪ·ʃən/
a ​satellite navigation ​system
(Definition of navigate from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"navigate" in Business English

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navigateverb [I or T]

uk   us   /ˈnævɪɡeɪt/
to ​lead a ​company, ​activity, etc. in a particular direction, or to ​dealeffectively with a difficult ​situation: We ​help new home-buyers navigate the complex and often confusing ​process of ​purchasing a ​property.navigate (sth) through sth She has successfully faced the ​task of navigating the ​company through its most difficult ​period in 25 ​years. The ​market has come and gone and ​management has been very ​successful in navigating through.
TRANSPORT to successfully ​find a way from one ​place to another: To ​reach the ​farm, ​producetrucks must navigate a dirt road with a ditch on one ​side. One ​study suggests ​cellphones could be ​disrupting bees' ​ability to navigate.
IT, INTERNET to ​move around within a ​website or between ​websites: The ​site is well-organized and ​easy to navigate.
(Definition of navigate from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of navigate?
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“navigate” in American English

“navigate” in Business English

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